Kernel not booting from grub.conf

HI All,

I have a New 64bit fedora 10 remote dedicated box from Hosting Company. I have updated its kernel from 2.6.27.21-170.2.56.fc10.x86_64 to 2.6.27.24-170.2.68.fc10.x86_64.

After rebooting Server its always boot from kernel-2.6.27.21-170.2.56.fc10.x86_64. It totally ignore the sequence of kernel booting defined in grub.conf. i have commented all older kernel entries in grub.conf except New one-2.6.27.24-170.2.68.fc10.x86_64. Even then it boot from older kernel 2.6.27.21-170.2.56.fc10.x86_64.

For information i have not installed lilo. Can anyone tell why and how server is booting from a specific kernel and not entertaining grub.conf.

I have checked the booting logs, server simply boot from kernel-2.6.27.21-170.2.56.fc10.x86_64 and not errors in logs. can someone tell me whats going on with my box.

Regards, mateen

Grub Error:13

Ravi's picture

Dear All,
I've generated rootfs using buildroot and copied (rsync -av /opt/* /media/CF) on compact flash
copied kernel vmlinuz image to /boot and edited menu.lst and
then I have install grub using grub-install successfully
But now I'm getting following error.
Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format.

Can anyone help me

regards
Ravi

grub: Error 13

Ravi Phulsundar's picture

Dear All,
I've generated rootfs using buildroot and copied (rsync -av /opt/* /media/CF) on compact flash
copied kernel vmlinuz image to /boot and edited menu.lst and
then I have install grub using grub-install successfully
But now I'm getting following error.

Can anyone hepl me

regards
Ravi

Check /boot

Mitch Frazier's picture

Make sure the kernel(s) you think you're booting exists in /boot.

It also might help to post your grub.conf in the forum.

Mitch Frazier is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal.

My problem has been solved

mateen's picture

Thanks Mitch Frazier:-

I have removed the /boot partition separately added for booting. MBR had
the boot entry on /, instead of /boot, which was causing the problem.

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