Keeping up with the Kims

The U.S. government isn't the only one hoping to stimulate its national economy by raising available Internet speeds. JooAng Daily in Korea reports that the Korea Communications Commission has announced an infrastructure investment plan that will increase high-speed iInternet service speeds to 1Gbps, and wireless broadband service speeds to 10Mbps. Both are 10x the current service speeds, which are far higher than those we enjoy (or endure) in the U.S..

Costs:

The plan calls for a total spending of 34.1 trillion won ($24.6 billion) over the next five years. The central government will put up 1.3 trillion won, with the remainder coming from private telecom operators. The project is expected to create 120,000 jobs.

Gotta like this too:

KT, the nation’s biggest landline phone operator, voiced support for the plan. “Under the plan, we won’t have to give up our landline phone business right away, and the mainstream is Internet telephony service, so we think the plan is positive,” said a KT official.

The KCC said the changes will make high-definition TV images up to 16 times clearer, and interactive TV services such as e-commerce and home schooling will also be possible. The service will also make it possible to watch I-Max films on home TVs.

Can you imagine an American telephone or cable company official saying the same thing?

So, a question. What does that kind of capacity to ordinary users invite for development, especially of the free and open source variety?

______________________

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

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Do you think there will come

Mikel Jison's picture

Do you think there will come a time when the speed is not really going equate to actual needs? For example, I have 2Meg connection speed, but I couldn't imagine why i'd need anything much faster. Maybe if I was downloading a lot of large files then I may need to upgrade my connection, but for normal internet use, what is the high speed useful for? Surely everything over a certain speed (say 2Meg) is more than enough for most?

Mikel (Webmaster for lazy boy recliners)

Keeping up with the fill-in-the-blanks

Doc Searls's picture

I went with the Kims because Kim is the most common family name in Korea. More here.

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

And yet...

kiwinewt's picture

Us here in the third-world countries like New Zealand are stuck on an average of 3-Mbit with a 5GB cap... Internet doesnt seem to be a priority here, and then theres the fact that our government is making everyone guilty until proven innocent with regards to downloading anything... It's stupid really...

[/rant]

The Kims?

theillien's picture

Come on man, you can do better than that. How about "Keeping up with the Jungs...es"? :p

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