I'll Show You Mine, You Show Us Yours

Before anyone shows me something we'll both regret, let me clarify I'm strictly talking about desktop screenshots.  :)

Our Desktop issue of Linux Journal is coming up, and we thought it would be fun to have a desktop contest!  Is your desktop awesome?  Is it super functional?  Insanely spartan?  Just green text on a black background?  Made from the shorn fur of a thousand puppies?

As you can see in the screenshot below, my desktop isn't anything special.  I have the applications I need in the task bar, and keep most of the things you see open all the time.  When it comes to work, most of it ends up being done in a terminal window or word processor.  (My jobs are non-stop excitement)

If I were editing a video, you'd see kdenlive running on a second virtual screen.  Apart from that, what you see is what you get.  I'm pretty boring. 

 


(Click To Embiggenate)

 

But we know YOU aren't boring!  Show us your desktop, and we'll pick our favorite.  That screenshot, along with information on who owns it, will be printed in our February issue.

What makes a desktop winning material?  You tell us!  Why should your desktop be immortalized in the February issue of Linux Journal?  Just remember, your editorial staff full of family friendly folks.  Well, for the most part anyway.  If my wife steps into my office and finds me sorting through desktop photos of hardcore pornography, let's just say we all lose.  Me especially!  (So keep it family friendly, for my kid's sake)

Oh, also HURRY!  This contest is only open until Monday, November 15th.  If you're the sort of person that would like to win a contest, you only have a few days to fabricate the perfect desktop.  If you're honest, like my pathetic screenshot above will attest to, it should be plenty of time to take a simple screenshot.

We are looking forward to seeing your screenshots.  Hopefully we get lots of entries, because if my screenshot is the only option, it will make for a sad winner's circle in our magazine.  :)

Enter Here!

______________________

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

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results

crlsgms's picture

when will the results (preferable the top5 also!) will be released?

bump

xiao_haozi's picture

Bump.... I'm also curious about this... can't wait to check out what the other LJ subscribers are up to.

unix screenshots

notKlaatu's picture

Lots of cool unix screenshots can be seen, and added to, over at http://www.unixporn.com (hey, don't worry, it's not porn it's unix, I promise!)

Heck, it even has its own scrot-like screenshot uploader written by a programmer named sigFLUP; free software from uberleethackerforce.deepgeek.us

check it out!

what are those icons in the

Anonymous's picture

what are those icons in the notification area? I can recognize skype, dropbox, pidgin, twhirl, but not the books icon?

It's Calibre

Shawn Powers's picture

I keep it running all the time so I can access my eBook library remotely. It's an AMAZING little cross-platform program.

The folder with a Skype icon is Skype Call Recorder.

The jar with a musical note is Pithos.

I think that covers 'em all. :)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

ratposion : No tiling please

mayuresh's picture

No screenshot as I make xterm look like console with black background and white text using ratpoison! And that's my default desktop!

May not sound a "cool" thing, though that's the one that best suites me.

Then why not use console itself? Well, I need full X environment and a number of regular X applications like web browser, though I spend most of the time with X terminal and use a lot of command line apps like mutt, remind etc on it.

Prefer to use every application in fully maximized form with no taskbar, resizebar etc. Some may call it a kiosk mode.

Unless a specific task demands I do not like the idea of tiling of windows on your screen. The operations like minimize, maximize, resize, pan etc. are simply an additional mental burden, IMHO. You should have the app you need right in front of you as if it's a kiosk. Ratpoison provides me that. Of course you can switch between such kiosks. This does not require tiling of them in overlapped form.

Sometimes when a task requires multiple applications visible simultaneously, you can always still have them in non overlapping frames in ratpoison.

I also set ratposion "rudeness" setting so that no popup can take focus automatically. Hate it when you are in the middle of typing and some of your keystrokes accidentally respond to a "rude" pop up that stole the focus. Even before you could read it, you end up responding to it!

Occasionally, if something badly demands a tiling window manager, I switch to WindowMaker using a ratpoison shortcut and back to ratpoison using a WindowMaker shortcut!

na

paulcsnider's picture

na

system memory

Bonez's picture

Shawn:

Just curious how much RAM you run with your system producing the screenshot? I am thinking it's time Santa Claus brought me a few critical system upgrade components.

RAM

Shawn Powers's picture

My desktop is actually a decent machine (unusual for me). I have only 6GB of RAM, but it's really fast RAM that works in sets of 3. So basically I have (3) 2GB chips.

I actually wish I had a little more RAM, especially when I start running multiple VMs. But 6GB works fairly well.

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

uhhh...

Josh's picture

...I'm sorry, did you just say only 6 GB of RAM? lol

%s/only/LOOK UPON MY RAM YE MIGHTY AND DESPAIR/g

Full-screen no-chrome

Gumnos's picture

Mine's about as boring as it gets -- running Fluxbox with no desktop icons and a black background, the slit and toolbar both auto-hide, so with no apps running, it's a black screen with a dark grey bar along the bottom. I then have my common apps running chromeless (Thunderbird, Firefox, and rdesktop are full-screen, while my xterm/rxvt terminals are 80x25 but also chromeless), so it just looks like a screen-cap of the application.

If you like that you should

Anonymous's picture

If you like that you should try out xmonad!

Done!

cbleslie's picture

Done!

I dont dare.

Anonymous's picture

I dont dare to give my screenshot. It might contain a bittorrent client and a media player playing an illegally downloaded episode of "The Big Bang theory" ;-)

Hey, You Don't Know...

Shawn Powers's picture

Maybe I pulled that from my TiVo machine, and renamed it the way a scene release would name it. You know, to fit in... :D

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

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