How much storage will you use 5 years from now?

0 - 100 GB
4% (135 votes)
100 GB - 499 GB
7% (244 votes)
500 GB - 999 GB
9% (307 votes)
1 TB - 9 TB
34% (1176 votes)
10 TB - 49 TB
24% (806 votes)
50 TB - 100 TB
10% (342 votes)
100 TB+
12% (405 votes)
Total votes: 3415

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0 - 100 GB or even lesser

thot's picture

Cloud computing ....

10-49 tera... i think

slider's picture

right now i have on my desktop 3.5 tera.... i think in a few years i will use 10 times more... so 10-49 TB will be enough for that moment... but thinking how fast the technology evolves... well... who knows what are the predictions

100TB Easy

Anonymous's picture

5 years ago my computer had a 7 GB hard drive... now I've got 3.5 TB. Considering in 5 years I've increased my hard drive requirements 500 fold, if the trend actually continued, I could end up using 1.75 PB (1,750,000 GB) 5 years from now. Now, I'm sure I won't be using even a petabyte by then, but considering how my storage requirements have exploded over the past 5 years, with the advent of HD video and high resolution photography, as well as how games and applications have exploded in size, I don't think it's at all unrealistic to believe I'll be using over 100 TB.

2+ Terabytes

John Jeffers's picture

Currently I have with VM's pictures and backups about 6 TB 5 years ago I had 20 gig.

Woot?

Clang's picture

I currently have a grand total of around 360 GB of hard drive space (200 GB on desktop and 160 GB on laptop) that has been there for years, but have only used roughly 80% percent of it. I don't proliferate huge multimedia contents on my drives very long--most of them get deleted within 3-4 months, thus I don't think I will ever need more than 600 GB five years from now.

Bad question

Anonymous's picture

People may not be answering the question correctly. There is a difference between how much space I "USE" and how much space I have "AVAILABLE" There is also a difference with how much space I "NEED" In my home between laptops, desktop and external drives I have about 4-5TB of space. But only a percentage of that is occupied and then consider the ammount of reduncy (file on laptop, copy on desktop, a backup copy somewhere, plus the digits copied to restore files).

Interesting case study (to me anyway) is my laptop. I have my OS and software, but my actuall files and documents I use alone only take about 30-40GB. Add another 100GB of music and 40GB of movies on a shared drive for the house. Figure my wife has the same file storage and all together there is only about 200-250GB of actual data. I dont trust thrid party cloud either, but I think the way forward will be private cloud. In a few years I expect to have what is now a desktop running as a server, with a very small OS (1GB or less) and 1TB of raided storage for the family. Then maybe a thin client hooked up to the HDTV and another thin cliet as a 'desktop' and a handful of tablets (mix of 7in up to 12in) -- all with the OS and software on relatively small SD cards. Plus access from a 3-4inch smartphone.

Work is a whole new story. We generate 1-2TB a year of new data, easy, and have storage requirements to keep data for minimum 5-7 years. 5years form now it may be a TB a month.

Storage

jaqian's picture

I'm currently using 1Tb and recently got a 2Tb for backup. Agree with first poster that range should have been smaller 1Tb-5Tb.

The future will definetly see more use of cloud technology as it matures but it won't be an either/or scenario IMO people will use both. I currently use google docs as a backup service.

1 TB - 9 TB range?

Sigmonsay's picture

1tb to 9tb is a huge range considering current hard drive technologies.

Everyone is likely to have atleast 1TB but I bet very few actually have more then 3TB. So this poll does not accurately represent much =/

Less than 100 GB

Anonymous's picture

First my hard drives are getting bigger and bigger but I still use the same amount that I used a few years ago, if not less (except for the OS :-\). Then we will more and more use online services and our data will be stored in the "cloud" (bad name). I'm talking about the *not important* data (movies, music, ...). Personal data I'm really not ready to let any service manage it, except for encrypted backups. And personal data don't need a huge storage.

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