Doc Searls's blog

Unpacking lock-in, silos and walled gardens

In the Linux and FOSS worlds we've been complaining for decades about vendor lock-in, platform and service silos, walled gardens and other annoyances. So now I'm wondering what scholarship has been devoted to these practices. more>>

What if they gave a DTV transition and nobody came?

Has anybody noticed that TV is no longer an over-the-air medium? more>>

Oracle buys Sun. Now What?

So Oracle bought Sun. Aside from the usual vendor sports stories (IBM lost this one), what's the deal here for Linux and other open source fixtures in both Sun's and Oracle's portfolios? What happens to MySQL? What happens to Java? How about Solaris? You tell us. more>>

The Need for Speed

I never liked the terms "upload" and "download". I think "inload" and "outload" might be better, just because they don't carry implications of subordination or unequal required effort.

As it happens most of our home connections are asymmetrical: much higher coming in than going out. more>>

The Free Beer Economy

Why is FREE! the world's best-selling noun, verb, adjective and adverb, yet so hard to credit as a foundation for business in the Internet Age? And what will happen when business folk finally grok the abundant opportunities that FREE! provides? more>>

Get ready for "fourth party" services

The time has come to re-define "parties" in business.

In software, "third parties" have always been accessories to supply more than to demand, because their job in most cases was to add value to a vendor's platform. But growth in customer power will invite a new kind of software and service into the marketplace: a kind that adds value to the customer's platform and weight to the customer's side of the market's equation. What do we call that new kind of software, and the kinds of companies that put it to use? more>>

What's the tweeting protocol?

Getting a fail whale this morning again on Twitter.

SMTP never gave me a whale. Nor has POP3, SSH, XMPP or any of the other protocols in the Internet Suite. more>>

Keeping up with the Kims

The U.S. government isn't the only one hoping to stimulate its national economy by raising available Internet speeds. JooAng Daily in Korea reports that the Korea Communications Commission has announced an infrastructure investment plan that will increase high-speed iInternet service speeds to 1Gbps, and wireless broadband service speeds to 10Mbps. Both are 10x the current service speeds, which are far higher than those we enjoy (or endure) in the U.S.. more>>

Wanted: a Mobile Home Cell

Ever wanted to improve AT&T wireless service? Yah, me too. Many times. Well, seems you can — with a "personal 3G mini cellular tower" from Cisco. more>>

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