Doc Searls's blog

The Rise of Independent Media

What would happen if anybody could produce radio or TV programming as easily as they consume it?What would happen if the natural limits to broadcasting went away?

Those questions only had sci-fi answers when I was a kid growing up in New Jersey, not far from the swamps later re-labeled "meadowlands", after a sports complex by that name appeared alongside Paterson Plank Road. In those days, back in the '50s and early '60s, I was like any other geeky kid who had better luck with science than with girls: I sublimated unrequited desire for the latter into preoccupation with the former. Since computers were still captive to big business, big defense and big science, I focused my science obsessions on big radio. more>>

Beyond Plug & Play

Monday at 1:00, at the Desktop Linux Summit in San Diego, I'm going to give a talk titled Plug 'n' Pray to Plug 'n' Play: What's it Going to Take? If you follow that last link, you'll find no details. I'm looking for your help with that, fellow Linux Journalistas. more>>

Panning flash

I love this quote from Douglas Crockford: What a Flash intro says to me is "I hate my job. What I really want to do is make films. But they won't let me do that because I don't have talent. So watch this Flash intro." Soon as I read it, I immediately thought of Dack Ragus, whose more>>

The Intention Economy

Is "The Attention Economy" just another way for advertisers to skewer eyeballs? And why build an economy around Attention, when Intention is where the money comes from? more>>

Let's help these folks start podcasting

Radio stations should archive programs as podcasts for the same reason newspapers and magazines should save stories as Web pages. Especially since it's so darn easy. And help is so handy. (Hint, hint.) more>>

The Home-Produced Movie Revolution

Will independent movie production grow in the garden fertilized by lousy broadband service? That's the question on the floor. more>>

Fon time

Fon has been around for awhile. Which is to say, three months. The Spain-based brainchild of Martin Varsavsky, it's a global community of people who share WiFi connections. Also a business. And it's about to get a lot bigger, because Google, Skype and Sequoia Capital have just invested $21.7 million in it. And if you're a "Linus", a "Bill", or even an "Alien", Martin explains, you get to benefit too. Or that's the idea, anyway. more>>

Where is Linux on Intel's desktop and laptop roadmap?

And what are the real stories on LaGrande, Trusted Computing, Viiv and Intel's DRM support? more>>

What's Intel up to with VIIV?

At the beginning of his CES keynote, where I'm sitting now, Intel CEO Paul Otellini said "We expect a wifi connection at the coffee shop, and we're disappointed when we dont get it." Well, the same goes for the CEO keynotes at trade shows. And there's no wi-fi here. But I have a bluetooth bridge to the net through my cell phone, so these are my public notes about the keynote, live — or as close as my typing can get to it. If I'm the only one reporting "Viiv live" here (pun intended), I've got a scoop in progress.

Okay, so... First, Intel actually introduced two new CPUs here. The first is its Core Duo, a dual-core for general and countless purposes. It's main virtues are low power consumption, and mutiple process execution. The other is the much-awaited VIIV ("vive" as in "vibe"). [Later note: A reader in the comments below points out that Viiv is a platform for entertainment PCs, much as Centrino is a platform for mobile computing. It includes a processor, but is not itself a processor. The two new processors are Core Solo and Core Duo.]

Some of us (myself included) have been concerned about the DRM capabilities reportedly built into ViiV, but in his presentation Otellini made clear that Viiv has been in development with Microsoft, as a new Wintel platform for home entertainment that comprises the next generation of Microsoft's home media offering.

There are 110 OEMs already. "The end of TV as you know it", "all served up over the internet". more>>

Is Intel Going Hollywood?

Linux was designed originally for the X86 platform. One of the core legacies of that platform was its openness. Will that legacy last?

Last month in Saving the Net, I sounded a warning about the carriers' threats to restrict the flow of "content" in the Net, to serve their own purposes, as well as those of the "content industry".

Now Intel is not only pushing Viiv as a new platform, but launching a new branding strategy, substituting "leap ahead" for its "intel inside" slogan. Both signal a re-alignment with the content industry, and a shift of core mareting interest away from the computer industry. Are they changing sides, from Silicon Valley to Hollywood? more>>

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