Pat Eyler's blog

More on Ruby Implementations

"Rubinius is a project to watch", so says Charles Nutter in his post Rite, Rubinius, and Everything — I think he's right. Evan is hard at work making things work better in rubinius. He's now got continuations working (I think this makes him the first alternative implementation of Ruby to do so), and says he should have serializable continuations soon (see his post on it here). W00t! more>>

A Snarly little graph of Ruby's Grammar

Nick Sieger, who attended the RubyConf 2007 implementers' summit has started exploring the seedy back alleys of Ruby, and is taking notes for the rest of us. After he spent some time with the yacc grammar, he came up with a nice little graph. Follow the link to see his travelogue, then you can do what I'm doing — waiting impatiently for the next iteration. more>>

A New JRuby Interview and More

Okay, non-interview stuff first. I've recently picked up several 'shortcuts' from O'Reilly and Addison-Weseley. I love this format. For about 10 bucks, you can get a PDF only copy of a 50-100 page "book". The shortcuts (so far at least) have been very focused, which allows them to cover a reasonable topic in sufficient depth without creating a monstrous 600+ page tome. The shortcuts I've looked at so far have been timely, useful, and a great value. October marks the beginning of Apress' push into Ruby and Ruby on Rails. Apress also has Practical OCaml coming out soon to help soothe your inner functional programmer. Now, on to interview news! more>>

Sun, Ruby, and Java: An Interesting Turn of Events

Wow! Sun has hired Charles Nutter and Thomas Enebo to work on JRuby full time. This is a pretty momentus event, and is already sending shockwaves around the Ruby world. more>>

Making waves in the Ruby world

There are three projects in the Ruby world that really stood out this summer: JRuby, Mongrel, and Ruport. It's not so much what they've done in terms of development (though that's been impressive), but how well they've communicated. This is something that a lot of projects don't do as well, so I wanted to take a look at what they've done in hopes that more projects might follow their lead. more>>

Quick Hits From Around the Ruby World

A lot of things are happening in the Ruby world right now, and I wanted to highlight a few of them here: At FOSCon this year, Amy Hoy has asked people to start writing more instructive articles about parts of Ruby or Rails so that newbies would have more "fine manuals" to read. I've tried to do my part with two short series (so far), one on RubyInline and the other on ruby-prof. The RubyInline articles are: RubyInline, making making things faster easier, and RubyInline: Going a bit Further. The ruby-prof articles are: Profile and ruby-prof, ruby-prof and call graphs, and Profile and ruby-prof: getting specific. Another blog related event is the current blogging contest being run by Ruby Inside. They're offering $100 US to their favorite informativ, ruby related blog post this week (Aug 14-20). There have been a lot of interesting entries so far. It would be pretty cool to see more contests like this crop up. We're getting close to a couple of Ruby conferences, I wrote about RubyConf*MI in my last post. RailsConfEurope is also comingu up quickly. If you're reasonable close to either of these, you should consider registering. O'Reilly has released the Ruby Cookbook. It's a massive tome, chock-full of Ruby goodness. I haven't had time to read the whole thing yet, but what I've read looks good, and I'm hearing good things from folks I trust. Looks like another good book to add to your Ruby bookshelf. APress is getting ready to jump into Ruby and Rails in a big way. They've got ten titles listed on their 'Rails Roadmap', and have lined up some well known Ruby names to write for them. They're still looking for some Ruby authors according to this blog post. No Starch Press is also starting to make some Ruby related noises. I can't be specific yet, but there's a good looking Ruby book on its way into their catalog. If the book is half as good as what they've talked to me about, it's going to be another 'must have'. The Pragmatic Programmers also look like they're set to add some more titles to their Facets of Ruby line. James Gray has said that he's writing a book for them that should be announced soon, Ezra Zygmuntowicz also has a book on the way, and I've recently signed a contract with them for a Ruby related book. It looks like the PragProgs aren't going to be content to sit on their Ruby laurels. Finally, Developerdotstar is close to announcing a couple of books about programming. Neither of these is Ruby specific, but from everything I've heard I think they're going to be solid, language independant books about becoming a better programmer. Just the kind of thing you'd expect from these guys. more>>

RubyConf*MI, OSCON, and "Ruby for Rails"

Coming off of a big week at OSCon it's time to announce RubyConf*MI, the first regional Ruby conference. It's being held in Grand Rapids Michigan on Aug 26th. It looks like a good conference, David Black will be speaking (the word is he'll be presenting a day of training through Ruby Power and Light ahead of the conference as well). I'm going to be speaking there too, along with several local Ruby hackers. You can see the speaker list or register for the conference at their website. more>>

Interview: JRuby Development Team

Alternative Ruby implementations seem to be on the move throughout the Ruby community. JRuby is the furthest along at this point, so I decided to talk to Charles Nutter and Thomas Enebo, two of the principal programmers on the project. Read on to hear what they have to say about Ruby, JRuby, and the art of re-implementing Ruby. more>>

A chip off the old (RubyConf) block.

A couple of days ago, I posted an antry on my private blog about the size and success of RailsConf, and wondered how it would impact RubyConf. I was pretty sure that Ruby Central was going to keep it small (based on chat's with Chad and an email from David Black. more>>

RailsConf 2006 is done, next up is the RailsConf Europe 2006

Well, the biggest news in the Ruby world this last week has been RailsConf (and of course, all the news that broke there). I didn't get to go, so I've been trying to follow the various blogs about how it went. You know things were good when you see comment's like this one (by Curt Hibbs), "My notes for this talk are completely blank because it was so engrossing that I forgot to write anything down!". more>>

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