Open Systems World/FedUNIX '95

The show included the second annual Linux Conference, sponsored by Linux Journal, which featured a day of informative sessions and tutorials and a one-day class for novices and intermediate Linux users.

Open Systems World/FedUNIX '95 was held the week of November 13 at the Washington Convention Center, Washington, DC. The show included the second annual Linux Conference, sponsored by Linux Journal, which featured a day of informative sessions and tutorials and a one-day class for novices and intermediate Linux users. The first day covered several topics, including an introduction to Linux, building a World Wide Web site with Linux, and porting to Linux. The one-day class, entitled “Linux for the New User”, was taught by the Editor of Linux Journal, Michael K. Johnson.

The trade show ran for two days following the Linux conference. Most of the Linux-related companies were in the same area and received a lot of traffic. The overall feel of the show was that Linux was one of the “hottest” topics and that we needed to work together to ensure the success of the “better” system.

Caldera had one of the largest Linux-related booths and was situated towards the center of the show floor. Open Systems World also set up a 40'x40' “Linux-Lounge” next to the Digital booth consisting of three cocktail tables surrounded by chairs where people could sit and talk about Linux. Whenever I passed the Linux Lounge, it was packed with people doing just that.

Although Open Systems World/FedUNIX occurred in Washington, DC during a federal government shutdown and the same week as Comdex in Las Vegas, it looked as though the Linux Conference was a success, and we are looking forward to next year.

______________________

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState