NetDVD: Building a Network-Attached Peripheral with Linux

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Use Linux to build your own network-attached peripheral.
Conclusion

In our testing, we've seen only one failure in hundreds of burns since moving to the new hardware, so we're confident that the NetDVD will be the stable archiving solution we need. As I write this, we are on the brink of installing NetDVD devices at two very enthusiastic beta sites. They've seen how it works already, and based on their reactions, I think we'll have a lot of NetDVD orders once it's officially released.

It has taken us about 15 months to reach this point, but most of that time was spent working on software that goes on our Solaris workstations and other things not related to the NetDVD. I'm extremely grateful to Ariel King and Dan Duckworth for their excellent work developing the new DVD archiving software for our workstations. That software was actually much harder to get right. I don't think we spent more than three developer-months working on the NetDVD device itself. Using Linux and other open-source software made that the easy part.

Resources for this article: /article/9071.

Bradford C. Smith is a software developer in the Molecular Imaging division of Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. He has been working with Linux and loving it since 1996, and he has been known to use the ed editor just for the fun of roughing it. He welcomes your comments at bradford.smith@usermail.com.

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