In Memoriam: John R. Hall

Community mourns the loss of a brilliant mind.


John R. Hall, a respected programmer, writer and Linux advocate, passed away on
September 17 at age 24.

John studied computer science at the Georgia Institute of Technology and
was the author of
Programming
Linux Games
, which he wrote at age 19 while interning
with Loki Software. He later worked at Treyarch. His other interests
included flying, gaming and music.

John chronicled his battle with cancer on his blog,
War.
He and friends also formed an American Cancer Society Relay for Life
team, Team
Melanoma
. John's Web page is available
here.

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Bayesian filtering for

prop's picture

Bayesian filtering for MoveableType? I didn't even know such a thing existed! I found a plugin written by James Seng.

Mi mas sentido pesame

Carlos R. Caicedo's picture

Lamento mucho la perdida de una persona tan joven, buena y talentosa. Mis condolencias para su familia. Su vida y obra quedan con nosotros.
Muchas personas de la comunidad Linux conocieron su valioso trabajo y estoy seguro sienten mucho pesar por su muerte. Que Dios le de fuerzas y consuelo a su querida familia.

Lamento mucho la perdida de

Anonymous's picture

Lamento mucho la perdida de una persona tan joven, buena y talentosa. Mis condolencias para su familia. Su vida y obra quedan con nosotros.

Rest in Peace

Andrew Matta's picture

I agree, I'm reading his book now. I hope there will be more people like him willing to share their knowledge. I didn't realize he was so young. I learned so much from the book that I thought I'd search to see if he'd written anything else only to find this page. It's really too bad that such a telented guy died so young.

His blog is really touching.

Rajesh Vijayarajan's picture

His blog is really touching. Quite, frankly when I read 'In Memoriam' in my RSS Feed I was expecting some legendary old guy with a thick white beard. Never even dreamt it would be someone as young as 24.
Really unfortunate.

who??

Anonymous's picture

It's sad that he died, but he wasn't exactly well-known. How does he deserve a mention here?

you're an idiot.

Anonymous's picture

you're an idiot.

On the contrary, I think he w

Anonymous's picture

On the contrary, I think he was indeed well known in the Linux community.

Czemu nie!

Frapazoid's picture

He was awesomes, and that's as good a reason as any.

I didn't really know him though... I just talked to him in a chatroom briefly several years ago, and I bought his book back when I was into gaming stuff.

You'd probably have to be more into gaming stuff to know of him though, and Linux gaming didn't quite catch on, except in specialty context. (Like cell phone games, and I ~think~ I heard the PS3 uses Linux but I wasn't paying much attention.)

If you weren't into Linux in the late 90s and early 00s, you probably missed all the Loki games and stuff.

Well loved in the community

Anonymous's picture

John was a well known author, contributor, and friend to many of those in the Linux community (me included). RIP

whoever "you" are

Anonymous's picture

just the anonymous community, I guess.

Still can't say he was well-known, but RIP anyway, Mr. Hall.

Come on...

Dan's picture

Please man, show some respect. I didn't know him, but he DID exist, and he was important to many people.

To everyone else, I'm sure people like John -shooting stars like him- who light up the sky of understanding, don't disappear. I'm convinced his influence will assist others in their efforts to discover, to create.

My best feelings to his friends and family.

Praying

Anonymous's picture

I wish you were still with us

RIP

Anonymous's picture

RIP

Thanks for sharring your

Anonymous's picture

Thanks for sharring your knowladge with so many people. RIP

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