2005 Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards

Some of your old favorites dropped off the Readers' Choice results this year. Has the Linux scene changed for good?
Favorite Office Program
  1. OpenOffice.org

  2. KDE Kontact

  3. LaTeX

Garnering over a thousand votes more than the second-place finisher, OOo has built a strong following in the Linux and Open Source community, thanks to its compatability and usability—not to mention our monthly Web column by Bruce Byfield, OOo Off the Wall. Check out his past columns on the LinuxJournal.com site for great documentation on using fields, creating templates and organizing work flows. And don't miss the reader comments, where questions are asked, answered, debated, clarified and argued some more.

Favorite Portable Workstation
  1. IBM ThinkPad

  2. Apple PowerBook

  3. Dell Latitude

We're all in suspense about what the new ThinkPad company, Lenovo, is going to do Linux-wise. Although ThinkPads are a common sight at Linux conferences, every one has to be tweaked or ordered through a company, such as EmperorLinux, that does a custom install for you. Do a Google search for ThinkPad, and right after thinkpad.com comes a Linux site, and six of the top ten results are Linux-related. HP's Linux laptop mysteriously vanished from the company's Web site without a trace, but maybe Lenovo will listen to their Linux-using fans instead of falling prey to mysterious marketing conspiracies.

Favorite Processor Architecture
  1. x86-64

  2. POWER

  3. IA-64

Readers were waiting for it, they needed it, coveted it, and once the 64-bit next generation of x86 became available, first from AMD, then from Intel, things just haven't been the same here. It's not even close anymore. We shouldn't talk, though; we've featured x86-64's 64-bit processing power in the last three Ultimate Linux Box articles. More power is good.

Favorite Programming Beverage
  1. Coffee

  2. Tea

  3. Water

Mmmm, coffee, that sounds great. Can you get me a triple-shot Americano, please? #c0ffee is even a valid hex color to try on your Web site.

Favorite Programming Language
  1. C++

  2. Python

  3. PHP

Back in early 2003, Don Marti asked the following question regarding C++: “Now that we have GCC 3.2.x...and an increasing collection of interesting free software using C++, is it time to take a second look at this perhaps unfairly maligned language?” He didn't expect that a mere two years later, C++ would win here. A lot of that has to be the rapid growth of Linux to include the world's C++ coders—welcome to Linux, all of you.

Favorite Server
  1. HP ProLiant

  2. Monarch Empro Custom Rack Server

  3. Unisys ES7000 Family

Last year, the HP ProLiant BL20p G2 won the Editors' Choice Award for Server Hardware. Now the readers are singing the ProLiant's praises.

A note to HP: please take this first-place win here, where second-place votes were less than half of what you received, as proof that we like your boxes, so you can cut out the pointless marketing poo-flinging at Sun, already.

Favorite System Administration Tool
  1. OpenSSH

  2. Webmin

  3. YaST

Looking back at past LJ articles on OpenSSH, we found titles such as “Doing It All with OpenSSH 1”, “Doing It All with OpenSSH, Part 2” and “The 101 Uses of OpenSSH”. So combining that with its big win here, it looks like you can do a whole lot with OpenSSH—and you are.

Favorite Text Editor
  1. Vim

  2. Kate

  3. Emacs

What, use something besides Vim? What do you have against orphans? Don't you know that “Vim is Charityware. You can use and copy it as much as you like, but you are encouraged to make a donation for needy children in Uganda. Please visit the ICCF Web site”; URLs available in the on-line Resources.

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Ubuntu and Debian help each

Balance's picture

Ubuntu and Debian help each other. Ubuntu is more polished than Debian and has a much smaller package set. Debian (unstable) gets packages updated more frequently and has a lot more to choose from.

Regardless of the distribution, this will likely improve support for all Distributions.

I'm agree

marissa's picture

I didn't vote, but I'm agree.

PHP is my favourite programming language ;-)

Agree with you, PHP rocks.

Cell Phone Reviews's picture

Agree with you, PHP rocks.

Programming language.

Dmitry I.'s picture

PHP is the best! But C++ is not too bad...

The same here. Especially

biżuteria's picture

The same here. Especially newest version.

Webhosting

Mohamed Ibrahim's picture

1&1 are providing excellent package compared to what I'm getting from bluehost.com. I wonder about their uptime / reliability.

Not for the large providers

Branchenbuch's picture

I usually don't like the large web hosters - you are just a number for them, as a small customer we usually all are. If you go to a smaller hoster they might have much more time for you.

XMMS?

Poprocks's picture

XMMS is old and unmaintained, I'm surprised it still was able to garner enough support to take the top spot. I would have thought amaroK would have taken the top spot, with Rhythmbox or Beep Media Player second.

Sure, XMMS2 is in the works, but the 1.2.x series uses GTK1... does anyone even keep GTK1 installed anymore?

XMMS?

Ian's picture

Amarok is heavy going for a system, except if you have a 2GHz+ machine. XMMS runs fine even on an old Pentium 200, but Amarok on that same system kills it. XMMS is a good, simple media player with lots of possibilities to extend it, and it works very well, which is why it has maintained its #1 place.

Postgres? It usually takes

Anonymous's picture

Postgres? It usually takes half of my CPU power - doing nothing. I prefer MySQL, its much thinner.

I would hope SQLite makes

Anonymous's picture

I would hope SQLite makes the top list in 2007!

xmms is clearly the best

Anonymous's picture

I've used xmms for three years now, clearly teh best audio player IMHO...

Hm

Replic's picture

yeah, really interesting review. Good choice and good sense)

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