Critical Server Needs and the Linux Kernel

A discussion of four of the kernel features needed for mission-critical server environments, including telecom.
Conclusion

Many challenges accompany the migration from proprietary to open platforms. One of the main challenge remains to be the availability of various kernel features and mechanisms needed for telecom platforms and integrating these features into the Linux kernel.

Ibrahim Haddad works for the Ericsson Research branch in Montreal, Canada. He also serves as contributing editor to Linux Journal. Ibrahim co-authored with Richard Peterson Red Hat Linux Pocket Administrator and Red Hat Enterprise and Fedora Edition: The Complete Reference (DVD Edition), both published by McGraw-Hill/Osborne. He currently is a Dr. Sc. Candidate at Concordia University.

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Re: Critical Server Needs and the Linux Kernel

OscarHinostroza's picture

The next generation Linux Server Based Telecom

Tank you Ibrahim Haddad

Re: Critical Server Needs and the Linux Kernel

smurfix's picture

Multi-FIB is already possible, in that you can mimic most of its effects with iptables; the kernel has supported multiple routing tables for some time now.

However, I do question the idea of doing this in the first place. This use case can only arise when two separate customers insist on using overlapping RFC-internal IPv4 address spaces for their servers and you need to put both of them onto one host. Better solutions to this problem exist (remap in the external load balancer, use IPv6, use virtual servers, use separate physical servers, ...).

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