SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

The SCO Group won't be going to court over chapters of a system administration book it copied without permission.

Controversial UNIX vendor The SCO Group apparently has paid to settle a copyright infringement complaint from San Francisco publisher No Starch Press.

"We have no issues with SCO at this time", said No Starch founder Bill Pollock in a telephone interview Tuesday. However, Pollock said last fall that he would insist on a payment from SCO in order to resolve the copyright dispute.

Some time before mid-2003, SCO copied entire chapters of a No Starch book, The Book of Webmin by Joe Cooper, into SCO's on-line documentation. The infringement was described last summer as "an open-and-shut case" by a person familiar with the facts. The Book of Webmin, originally copyrighted in 2000, is available on the Web, but it is not licensed for redistribution.

SCO spokesperson Blake Stowell could not be reached for comment.

Don Marti is Editor in Chief of Linux Journal.

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Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

Funny...

http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/05/13/1732221&mode=thread&tid=133&...

What is a reader to do with this circled linkage...

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

"SCO spokesperson Blake Stowell could not be reached for comment."

That makes a change.

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

Actually, we haven't heard from Darl and the boys for a while. No ludicrous statements. No bold and cunning plans. No 'all your code are belong to us! Muahahahaha!' On Yahoo's finance boards, you could count on an almost daily press release from them or their lackeys. The last news listed is from May 7 and it's about Royal Bank pulling out.

All this takeover business must be keeping them busy. Well, that and the fact that Groklaw keeps track of all verbiage over time.

I'm certain that Darl now wishes he'd shut his mouth and stuck to what few facts there are.

-Chordonblue

Giving them the same treatment

Anonymous's picture

Perhaps No Starch Press should have sued for billions of dollars, claiming that SCO had violated their "intellectual property", but not actually mentioning which "IP" was involved. Then they could have threatened SCO customers with lawsuits.

But given that they actually had a case, I suppose the legal charades really weren't necessary.

Re: Giving them the same treatment

Anonymous's picture

You make a good point. In the end the Attorneys are the real winners regardless of the outcome.

Re: Giving them the same treatment

Anonymous's picture

Actually, what they should do is threaten to sue every person who has a copy of that documentation, or has read the documentation.

Corporate culture sticks...

Anonymous's picture

...and dishonesty breeds dishonesty, as lawlessness breeds lawlessness -- what bit the Bush admin in recent days :-) SCNR.

Re: Corporate culture sticks...

Anonymous's picture

>what bit the Bush admin in recent days

This isn't the time or place for your political views.

You may agree or disagree with our current president, but two facts are constant: 1) he was elected by our constitutional process; 2) you may have the opinion that he is dishonest, or lawless, but that is an OPINION. Personally, I spent four years in the USMC defending your right to have that opinion. I respect it as yours. I don't agree with it, but that is a conversation that does not belong on this site.

Have the courtesy to keep your political views to yourself, and discuss the relevant facts this site was meant to disseminate...

SCO vs. Linux

An unfortunate, anonymous Linux supporter

Re: Corporate culture sticks...

Anonymous's picture

BTW, Just to clarify....

I am not an unfortunate Linux supporter....

It is unfortunate that due to my company, position, and our legal department, I have to remain anonymous.

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

I agree. The old SCO-UNIX was fine. In the mid 90s we had an application running on a single server using SCO and Informix (386, then later 486) that controlled an entire factory manufacturing line. Barcode scanners, printers, terminals, networked deviced, high voltage controllers, etc. Worked well, ran for months without reboots. Now the factory has multiple Win NT servers doing the same work. Pretty GUI displays and nearly daily reboots.

I guess SCO must know copied code when they see it, since they're proven plagarizers. ;-)

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

This is good to hear.

As for crappy SCO, I used SCO for many years. Understand that this, for all intents and purposes, is not the same company. SCO-UNIX was a decent product. It ran well, had a great admin utility for compiling the kernel, and for what it was worked. As for locking terminals, yes we saw this too. However, so much of that was attributed to multiport boards that were suspect. The early Computone stuff was problematic. We made the move to Digi and things were much better. The ability to reset ports from a utility helped a lot. I don't knock OpenServer by any means. I just hate to see the direction SCO v.2 (aka SCO Group) has taken.

>

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

I've really got no real SCO admin experience but my little story seems to agree with you that SCO OpenServer was certainly stable.

A few months ago I had to take down a SCO OpenServer box and move it to VMWare (business changing hands; BTW getting OpenServer to boot in VMWare is royal pain, especially when all you know is Linux and a tiny bit of Solaris).

It was an integrated, industry specific, accounting/workshop managment/stock managment/service managment app. Entirely text based. Kept about 15 dumb terminals ticking over for about 8 years (uprades along the way of course). The owners claimed it never had to be manually rebooted. When I removed it, it had an uptime of almost 500 days; supposedly the last time they turned it off was when they installed a new air conditioner into the room.

I was quite amused. Nobody knew how to turn it off. Someone remembered a small notepad somehwere with a handful of sysv notes (disk validation, backups, change time/date, etc). The first note said: "To turn off: do NOT just turn the server off. Exit {app} and type: 'init 0' {return}. Wait until it is finished shutting down. Then turn the server off."

Re: SCO Copies from Book, Settles with Publishing Company

Anonymous's picture

Computone products, locking up for unexplained reasons? Perish the thought.

Re: Terminal cards

Anonymous's picture

Our Staillion cards worked rather nicely here. I've still got one, and it's _gigantic_ port block, on the shelf behind me...

SCO Copies from Book

Anonymous's picture

Glad they got caught. I still don't think anyone copied their crappy code. I had to use a SCO box with a bunch of serial terminals off of it at a restaurant. I have to tell you that was the biggest piece of crap computer ever. Slow boot and slow at backups. On a busy night we could count on it to lock up at least two terminals.

Re: SCO Copies from Book

Anonymous's picture

OpenServer (at least v5.0.5) isn't so bad, when you take it's age into account. It's reliable and the documentation is OK. Admittedly, that's about it for positive things I can say about it.

It also has some long standing painful bugs, like the lpd stopping responding after a while, the manserver dying for no apparent reason, etc. The tcl admin programs are quite nice, with the exception that if they play up they often manage to break forever.

I do loathe the filesystem "organisation" though. Executables in /lib and /etc (!!!), configuration files scattered everywhere, etc.

It also has shell tools from the dark ages. Hit 'tab' in sh (yeah, berkley shell, the default shell) and it displays 4 spaces. Backspace, and it removes one of them... but thinks it's removed one "tab" character. If you backspace three more times, your original command:
more
has become
m
Good stuff. Thankfully, they provide a lot of Open Source tools in the Skunkware repository, so you don't have to endure the ancient built in tools.

I find OpenServer OK, so long as I touch it as rarely as possible and use a cron job to restart lpd nightly. It runs reliably forever. Of course, as soon as you change /anything/ you're in danger.

Re: SCO Copies from Book

Anonymous's picture

Just to clarify things, no one (not even SCO) is claiming that someone copied SCO's crappy code. The issue (as i understand it anyway) is whether or not the parts of AIX (ie. IBM's code) that were incorporated into Linux are considered as derivative works under some contract (or was it a license?) that SCO acquired from Novell (and allegedly derived from code Novell acquired from AT&T). If so then IBM doesn't have the right to incorporate their own code into Linux.

It is absolutely ridiculous on so many levels.

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