Centralized Authorization Using a Directory Service, Part II

Get a handle on administering who can log in where, with a proven, reliable centralized directory.

in their /etc/nsswitch.conf files.

Conclusion

Once you are over the initial hurdle of installing an NIS server and making your authorization data consistent, you can start enjoying the centralization. Netgroups allow for complex and fine-grained access control from one central place.

Resources for this article: www.linuxjournal.com/article/7967.

Alf Wachsmann, PhD, has been at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) since 1999. He is responsible for all areas of automated Linux installation, including farm nodes, servers and desktops. His work focuses on AFS support, migration to Kerberos 5, a user registry project and user consultants.

______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Part I Please

shann's picture

can you post the link for the Part I of this article?

thanks & regards
shann
massoo@30gigs.com
massoo@gmail.com

Links

Pasamio's picture

Central Authentication with Kerberos 5
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7336 (Part I)

Centralized Authorization Using a Directory Service
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7334 (Part II)

AFS - A Secure Distributed Filesystem
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7521 (Part III)

Was a bit confusing since the article titles are all different.

Geek Guide
The DevOps Toolbox

Tools and Technologies for Scale and Reliability
by Linux Journal Editor Bill Childers

Get your free copy today

Sponsored by IBM

Webcast
8 Signs You're Beyond Cron

Scheduling Crontabs With an Enterprise Scheduler
On Demand
Moderated by Linux Journal Contributor Mike Diehl

Sign up and watch now

Sponsored by Skybot