Ultimate Linux Box

AMD64 looks great on paper, but can you build a high-end system with 64-bit processors and have all your device drivers work? We mix the hottest new processor architecture with the latest video, audio and storage devices and watch for smoke.

Glenn Stone is a Red Hat Certified Engineer, sysadmin, technical writer, cover model and general Linux flunkie. He has been hand-building computers for fun and profit since 1999, and he is a happy denizen of the Pacific Northwest.

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Re: Ultimate Linux Box

geoffleach's picture

I actually went and bought one. Its running Fedora Core 2 quite nicely, using drivers from Broadcom (open source) and Nvidia (closed source). The MB also features a Promise RAID controller for the SATA drives, which is supported by the 2.6 kernels.

FWIW, I was not overly impressed by Monarch's quality and build processes. To be fair, however, they did eventually clear up all of my problems.

Re: Ultimate Linux Box

Anonymous's picture

The configuration for the ULB includes SATA disks. I was unable to find specific support for SATA in either the 2.4 or 2.6 kernels, which means that the ULB makes a nice boat anchor, so far as Linux is concerned. Hopefully, someone will tell me I'm wrong.

Re: Ultimate Linux Box

Anonymous's picture

Serial ATA is on the SCSI menu in the 2.6 kernel

Re: Ultimate Linux Box

Anonymous's picture

Looking at the suse website, there's a link on their support page for paid support to configure SATA.

http://www.suse.com/us/private/support/inst_support/support_overview.htm...

If they provide phone support, then it would seem that the suse linux enterprise server 8 has the capability for SATA built in. I could be wrong tho...

Re: Ultimate Linux Box

Anonymous's picture

Had the same good experience with SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 (SLES8) and the YaST2 tool makes administration chores a simple enough that a junior admin can do it with little supervision. I work for a large Brokerage house on Wall Street and we were looking to explore the AMD processor for some of our work. Called SuSE since as the article stated they have supported 64 bit computing on the Opteron the longest. We were informed by SuSE that they had a business partner, Systems Solutions in the Downtown NYC area, when we contacted them it turned out they are a couple of blocks form our location. Upon arriving we signed the obligatory non-disclosure agreement, we informed the group from Systems Solutions that we were interested in the AMD version of SLES 8 and were particularly looking to run it in a clustered environment. They asked if we had decided on which hardware platform we wanted to run, which we hadn

Re: Ultimate Linux Box

geoffleach's picture

Glenn,

Thanks for another great ULB article. I may just treat myself to one! Regarding your choice of graphics card, is it correct that NVIDIA does not make the cards, but just the chips? I concluded this from the fact that they don't have end user products. In any event, Monarch offers PNY cards and it seems that the FX1000 has been replaced by the FX2000; the former is now priced at $784 and the latter at $1220. There's also an FX1100. So, (finally, the point!) given this, do you have a feeling for what your choice would be today?

Thanks.

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