Interview with Dr. Moshe Bar

A conversation with the project leader of openMosix about its origins, its purpose and its future.
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nice to know about such a

Anonymous's picture

nice to know about such a great personality

Re: Interview with Dr. Moshe Bar

Anonymous's picture

I've observed closely the openMosix development model and the workings... What I find is that there was no "new" code contributed by Bar. Some of the code is straight lifted from the MOSIX tree, after the fork. This holds him in very low credibility. I doubt if Bar can even code. He talks about contributing, but I don't see that happening. In fact, where do you look for contributions? Little or no talk about patches or features happens on the openmosix-devel mailing list.

Also, it seems the entire team that used to contribute, test, build packages, etc. is now replaced by a new team... may be Bar couldn't handle the ego of even one of them.

He doesn't also mention where he's done his PhD from, what specialization, where the thesis reports are, etc.

Show me the code

Anonymous's picture

Was openMOSIX *really* ported to IA64? If so, where is the code? It is not in the CVS, and the code is not to be found. Or was it just some exercise of some university course, which never proved to work, and was hidden before it got published?

Re: Show me the code

Anonymous's picture

http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=46729&atid=447173

You should check the patches section more often

Re: Show me the code

Anonymous's picture

The file that you can download if you follow that link -http://sourceforge.net/tracker/index.php?func=detail&aid=719705&group_id=46729&atid=447173- is 3 bytes long.

There is not a "IA64" port. It's only a link to a link to a non-existent path. He is lying.

Re: Show me the code

Anonymous's picture

when they say ported they mean that the code can now be compiled on IA-64 systems.

Re: Interview with Dr. Moshe Bar

Anonymous's picture

On what basis (apart from Bar claiming he deserves that) do people relate to him as a Dr.? Where did Bar do his academic degrees? what about? Where are Bar's thesises available from?
He has been asked these questions more than once, and simply avoided them!

Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

I try not to do anything that profits Zionism or Wahhabism.

That is my choice and I do not wish to discuss it here with the various pro- and anti- zealots.

Unfortunately my government uses my tax dollars to support Israel and Saudi Arabia, so I don't get as much freedom of choice as I'd like! I donate as much as I can to the Palestinian Red Crescent as a small, futile gesture of penance.

Anyway, I won't pay for anything that Dr. Barr contributes to, since he's apparently an Israeli Zionist.

My money, my choice, not something I'm forcing on anyone else.

Re: Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

what is zionism?

No one asked for your help

Anonymous's picture

The israelis are doing allot to support the OpenSource linux clustering. Both the people in the Hebrew Uni. and Dr. Bar are israelis. if you dont want to use israeli product you can also stop using Intel's processors because 10% of their R&D is in israel (the only major R&D center outside the US.)

Stop using the new Centerino (tm) processors that were developed only by the Israeli team in Haifa israel. Stop using microsoft windows because parts of it were developed by the Tel Aviv team. Stop using AIX because it's compiler and kernel was developed by the Texas team and the Israeli team. Stop using ICQ , developed by ICQ.com in israel.
Stop using the RSA. (The "S" is prof. Shamir of the hebrew Univ.)

You get the picture.

If you are a willing to invest in white owned buisnesses then good luck with that. We are living in the modern world and there is no place for descrimination and hate. I dont care who coded my kernel , I dont care if they are black or white. They are people , smart good hard working people. Get over it!

Re: No one asked for your help

Anonymous's picture

I am an American and am proud of it... When it comes to "Computers, Internet, OpenSource", I don't care where it come from as long as it follows the following criteria: It works, reliable, no violent security holes, and its free. I often give back to the OpenSource community. I agree with the statement above that the people involved in the OpenSource movement are smart, hard working, and forward thinking people.

By the way, I don't hate Muslims! I was in the Marine Corps for 8 years! Had a muslim roommate in college. Muslims aren't terrorists! Terrorists have varied backgrounds and ethnicities. What you don't see is that there is a difference between Islam and Terrorists.

The modern world is definitely global! May OpenSource Movement show the world that there is hope for the world to interact together in peace and harmony.

Re: No one asked for your help

Anonymous's picture

While there is a Prof. Shamir in the Hebrew University, the Shamir whose S is in RSA is from the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot.

Re: Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

Hi,
I'm a Moroccan citizen. I always appreciated Moshe's work but I
don't appreciate too much his web postings about arabs and
palestinians.
Most Israelis operating in open-source are friendly and pro-peace.
We even managed to work on joint BiDi enabling projects and
it is now borrowed by many hebrew and arabic projects.
I would like to ask Dr. Moshe whether he can accept one
day an invitation to Morocco to give a kernel talk or should I
stop dreaming ?
ps: one of my instructors in Morocco was Isreali citizen indeed.
and we don't have problems with this fact here.

Re: Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

It may be worth noting that of all the major Arab countries, Morocco is the only one that still has a sizable Jewish population (several thousand), whereas the other countries expelled their Jewish citizens in 1948 and subsequent years, frequently without compensation.

Perhaps significantly, Morocco also is about as far away from Saudi Arabia and the Wahhabists as you can get.

Re: Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

Good job openMosix is free then isn't it? And what's more, the GPL, and open source certified software in general, doesn't allow you do something like add a clause saying 'Not to be used in country X, by people Y, or application Z'. No politics there.

Re: Politico-religious extremism and open source

Anonymous's picture

Upppps!

The dogs are barking!

20 years of openMOSIX??

Anonymous's picture

It was MOSIX on which 20 years of academic research was done. 20 years of scientific work by Barak, Shiloh, LA'adan, Braverman, Amar, Keren et. al. Where is Bar's contribution to MOSIX? openMOSIX is just a recent fork of the work of giants!

Re: 20 years of openMOSIX??

Anonymous's picture

Almost for got to mention both Shiloh and Amar still contribute to the oM code base which grew out of the last GPL'd version of MOSIX. So yes I would say that oM can claim the same history.

Re: 20 years of openMOSIX??

Anonymous's picture

He was Project Manager for MOSIX. But hten you would know this if you read the interview.

What is NODESPEED ?

Anonymous's picture

I had built the openMosix Cluster successfully and my cluster operate good. But when I configure openMosix, I didn't understand the NODESPEED option in /etc/openmosix/openmosix.config.
Please help me.
Thanks

Cheer On!

Anonymous's picture

More cheerleading on the

Cheer on? SCO, this is ridiculous. We know it's you.

Anonymous's picture

Save yourself the trouble.

Re: Cheer on? SCO, this is ridiculous. We know it's you.

Anonymous's picture

Duh...

The Dark side of open source

Anonymous's picture

The Dark Size of open source: Prof. Barak works all his life (literaly)
on MOSIX, and some youngster comes in, take the source code
and claim all the glory. All ofcourse under the pressure of VCs who
could care less about open source, fairness, honesty, or the scientific spirit.

Re: The Dark side of open source

chronicon's picture

Nice troll but please, get some rest!

Forks happen. It happens all the time. If you don't want someone to fork your "life's work" then don't ever issue your code under the GPL. It's that simple. Who doesn't understand this?

If you issue under the GPL and someone forks, you have no one to blame but yourself. Again, simple. There's no mystery there for the astute readers of Linux Journal. However, on the other side, proprietary licensing leaves everyone in the dark...

Now, if you desire community involvement, community support, bugfixes, patches, if you desire to "share the wealth" and generate interest in the project then the GPL works (and obviously in this case works very well) to the benefit of (if the article is correct) the largest installed userbase of any SSI clusters in the world.

Thanks Dr. Barr for CONTINUING the development of this GPL clustering system. Countless have benefited. And, thanks Linux Journal for an excellent interview and review of where openMosix is today and where it is headed in the future.

Why does venom always seem to come Anonymously?

Re: The Dark side of open source

Anonymous's picture

Is it just my impression or are the Comment Posts of every open source related web site being bombarded by proprietary software "simpathizers"? Why are they always anonymous? Isn't it a coincidence that it started after SCO decided to vilainize every Open Source advocate?
Marius

Re: The Dark side of open source

Anonymous's picture

What's so dark about it? Prof. Barak wanted to change the licensing of the project, maybe even take it proprietary. I have never heard it suggested that Moshe Bar is a gloryhound. He contributed to and managed Mosix with an understanding of the terms for doing so (GPL). It's some of Mr. Bar's life's work if you will. Prof. Barak wanted to change the license so Bar split. Simple as that.

It's been noted that Linus Torvalds is a pragmatist and not a politician. Richard Stallman gets hacked off about it in interviews every chance he gets. Torvalds has said in many interviews that the reason why the Linux kernel is GPLed is because he wants contributing developers to trust him. No one would have contributed to Linux if Linus could just change the license and then take all of the credit and all of the money. Once Professor Barak changed the license on Mosix, a number of developers ceased to trust him or even if they did trust him were unwilling to work under a different social contract.

Moshe Bar has not commited any sort of theft or taking. He excercised the rights the GPL conferred on him to continue working on his old project under the same terms he started working on it.

The other version of the story

Anonymous's picture

Well, this is the story as Bar presents it. But I heard another version: I heard MOSIX code was available freely, until Bar had the idea of making money out of the hard work of Prof. Barak and his colleagues. Only then did Prof. Barak change the license.

Re: The other version of the story

Anonymous's picture

There is alittle problem with your compliant. You see while Prof. Barak has made his tree proprietary, Moshe has left the oM tree GPL'd and free to everyone,including Prof. Barak to use.

Re: The other version of the story

Anonymous's picture

But then kind of stopped developping it, and focused on Qlusters' propriatary product (the one with all of those wonderful features).

Re: The other version of the story

Anonymous's picture

I heard MOSIX code was available freely, until Bar had the idea of making money

I can only reiterate Dr. Bar's statement: "It's a lot of work to manage an open-source project, and the rewards are minimal."
I would have no interest in Dr. Barak's work, were it not for the openMosix project.

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