Linux-Powered Wireless Hot Spots

If you're setting up a wireless gateway for work or a public place, configure it to authenticate users and prevent abuse.
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Won't install!

anonymous's picture

NoCat won't install! when I type make gateway it just says:

Looking for gpgv...
Checking for firewall compatibility: No supported firewalls detected! Check your path.
Supported firewalls include: iptables, ipchains, ipf, pf.
Can't seem to find supported firewall software. Check your path?
make: *** [check_fw] Error 255


And I DO have firewall software and a firewall!
HELP!!!

Usually I would be able to figure this out but not this time!

PS: I am using fedora 11

Great article!

Wade3445's picture

I searched long and hard to find something this detailed when I was trying to figure out how to set up open source hotspots. Great job.

Wade
82nd street hotspot software

Access point DHCP

Diego Piersanti's picture

i have a question: if i run the DHCP from the Access Point and not from the gateway, NoCat can catch the users?
In the config there is an option to use if the gateway is connected to a NAT, but is not explained how it works.

Re: Linux-Powered Wireless Hot Spots

Anonymous's picture

Hello, I am about to open a hot spot and I would need to charge people, a small amount to pay for the high speed internet and the hardwhere. Could I use this softwhere to create my own user names and passwords and sell them? If i can, can I give each password only blank amount of min.?

Were you able to build your

Anonymous's picture

Were you able to build your hot spot (charging) using the Nocat product? if yes, please explain as I am interested too.

Re: Linux-Powered Wireless Hot Spots

Anonymous's picture

if you're charging you could look into this: zyxel.com .. they offer some very nice products for small businesses, tho the wireless gateway i test ran didnt have the ability to use permanent user:pass combos, so it was unsuited for my needs.

Re: Linux-Powered Wireless Hot Spots

Anonymous's picture

Could you please put Figure 2 up again?

Thanks in advance!

Re: Linux-Powered Wireless Hot Spots

Anonymous's picture

Very nice article. I use nocat exactly as the author described to provide a free public access point in downtown San Diego:
Little Italy Wireless

The Linux distribution that I use is Multi Network Firewall (from MandrakeSoft). This is a very nice firewall product that allows the creation of fairly complex firewall rules with an easy to use web interface. It also has an impressive set of network monitoring capabilities and supports VPNs, tunnels, etc.

Recently I began to use NoCat for its 'captive portal' feature. This allows me to display a splash page when a user wants to access the network. Eventually I may use the authentication part of the software.

Many thanks to the nocat developers who provide such a wonderful Free Software application.

Phil Lavigna

phil@littleitalywifi.com

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