PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Why the question of whether Intel would release Linux drivers for the new Centrino machine is symptomatic of a bigger issue.
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Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

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Re: PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Anonymous's picture

For most applications in my company our old Pentium 166's are good enough. (We run Linux, of course!) We've benchmarked many of the newest machines and they are not significantly faster than the old Pentium Pro 200's, at least when the old machines are given fast disks and modern 3D graphics cards.

Re: PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Anonymous's picture

Hit Ebay and pick up a Pentium Pro Overdrive chip. They are 333Mhz and have 512k cache that runs at processor speed. With a All In Wonder Pro Video card and 2940 SCSI Ultra Wide it runs just fine. The old Gateway 2000 boxes are perfect for this.

Re: PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Anonymous's picture

I purchased a P4 based laptop at the end of February, but due to flaky hardware, I am in the process of swapping it out for a different model. I _am_ considering a Centrino based model strictly on the basis that Intel says they have drivers and will release them when/if the demand appears. I figure that there is a better chance of having (working) Intel drivers for sound/modem/wireless than there is in (working) drivers for the SiS based laptop it will be replacing.

I will also be forwarding a message to Intel expressing my vote, "based on MONEY", that they need to support this large and reluctant market, as soon as I know who to send it to!

I think its a Catch 22 situation... they won't support it until there is demand, and there won't be demand until they support it. I will be one to break that standoff, and put my money where my mouth is!

So there, Intel, its your move!

Follow-up

Anonymous's picture

Just as a follow-up...

I picked up the Centrino based laptop last night.
Now on to the crusade to get Intel to release the drivers.

Re: PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Anonymous's picture

The drivers are available. What can't be separated from them is the "Digital Rights Management" seamlessly built into the drivers. Since "who has the rights to what" is frequently a subject of dispute in American courts, there is no way that this embedded DRM is ever going to work out fairly for all owners of Centrino notebooks. You may have perfectly legal rights to whatever you're attempting to transmit, but the mindless DRM may behave otherwise. All linux users need is a whole new category of headaches (thanks, Intel!)

Re: PC Forum: Embedded in Scottsdale

Anonymous's picture

Good point, Doc. I don't own a single machine above 600 MHz, and they are all fast, full-featured computers running modern software and running it well. They're safe too -- each workstation runs a different Linux distribution, patched and secured. I want for nothing.

The hype surrounding increased performance is ridiculous, as the organizations that need such resources are probably getting them already. And they aren't being provided by Intel necessarily either! The traditional "Wintel" union of constantly producing more bloated software and faster chips to use it may be coming to an end. At least I hope that's a positive consequence of the current economic downturn.

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