UpFront

LJ Index—April 2003
  1. Sum offered (and paid out in January 2003) by Lindows founder Michael Robertson for the successful port of Linux to Microsoft's Xbox by the end of 2002: $100,000

  2. Sum offered by Robertson for a port to Xbox with no hardware modification by the end of 2003: $100,000

  3. Year by which Linux is expected to become the majority server operating system: 2009

  4. Position Linux is expected to occupy soon among desktop operating systems: 2

  5. Price in rupees of Hewlett-Packard's AMD 1.5GHz Athlon-based Presario home computer, sold with Red Hat Linux: 30,990 ($645 US, as of January 3, 2003)

  6. Price in rupees of Hewlett-Packard's Intel 1.6GHz Intel-based Presario home computer, sold with Windows XP: 40,000 ($833 US, as of January 3, 2003)

  7. Additional discounts on the Linux Presario, in rupees, from “assemblers”: 2,000

  8. Millions of Google results from a search for “Linux” on November 29, 2002: 41

  9. Millions of Google results from a search for “Linux” on January 2, 2003: 59

  10. Growth in “Linux” results per day over the same period: 529,412

  11. Position of Linux among Google's top ten technology searches in 2002: 4

  12. Position of Microsoft among Google's top ten technology searches in 2002: 9

  13. Number of applications shown on stage by Sun Microsystems at Comdex Fall 2002: 2

  14. Number of applications shown on stage by Sun Micrososytems at Comdex Fall 2002 that ran on Linux: 2

  15. Percentage of servers on which Linux is expected to run by 2006-2007: 45

Sources
  1. 1, 2: Xbox Linux Project (xbox-linux.sourceforge.net)

  2. 3: Butler Group Server Operating Systems Report (www.butlergroup.com)

  3. 4: IDC (via ZDNet)

  4. 5-7: Financial Express

  5. 8-10: Google

  6. 11, 12: Search Engine Watch

  7. 13, 14: Doc Searls, reporting from Comdex

  8. 15: Meta Group, quoted in BusinessWeek

They Said It

When a need comes up for a new file or print server, don't talk about installing a Linux box. Talk about installing a new file or print server. As long as what you implement does the job and works reliably, no one will care how it's done as long as it works.

—Craig Sanders, Debian developer and professional system administrator

A for-profit software company cannot compete with the economics of open source—free is as cheap as it gets. Nor, it turns out, can it compete with open source's quality testing process. Though the pace of open-source development can be languid and tends to create products less functionally rich than their proprietary counterparts, the stuff gets tested so often and so brutally by so many different people that most open-source programs are judged to be more stable and reliable. In a commodity market, low cost and reliability count more than bells and whistles.

—Christopher Koch, CIO Magazine

What I've found is that a Linux administrator who knows what he's doing should be able to administer two to three times the amount of boxes a Windows administrator should be able to administer.

—Brian Schenkenfelder, n+1

Mongolian makes the impossible possible and enters the list at a whopping 15th place (supported). Sanlig Badral, Ochirbat Batzaya, Tegshbayar, Bayarsaihan and the other guys in the Mongolian team have certainly made an impressive start by jumping right in the top crowd with over 95% translated messages!

—Christian Rose, on the GNOME-I18n Mailing List (GNOME is now 100% translated to Mongolian)

For all the Perl mongers out there, this shell might be for you. It has a number of the features of Bash, but it's a little more Perl-friendly. I've recently started using it as my login shell, so we shall see. It's certainly lighter. If you're skeptical, ask me if I'm using it a year from now. I see a day when Perl may replace all the other system utilities (if one is so inclined), but until then, I'll be satisfied with a Perl shell. Requires: Perl, BSD::Resources (optional).

—David A. Bandel

Advanced Packet Sniffer: www.swrtec.de/clinux

As I noted when I originally reviewed this application three years ago, this particular sniffer is unlike tcpdump. Here, you can see the packet payload, which may make a lot of sense to you or none at all (particularly if someone is using an encrypted connection). One of the reasons I most like this sniffer is you can show someone what information is floating around on their network for anyone to read. Requires: glibc.

—David A. Bandel

Mongolian makes the impossible possible and enters the list at a whopping 15th place (supported). Sanlig Badral, Ochirbat Batzaya, Tegshbayar, Bayarsaihan and the other guys in the Mongolian team have certainly made an impressive start by jumping right in in the top crowd with over 95% translated messages!

—Christian Rose, on the gnome-i18n mailing list (GNOME is now 100% translated to Mongolian)

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