Power Sessions with Screen

Adam explains the many benefits and uses of screen.
Further Information

You can find further information on screen in the screen documentation. The documentation is provided in both man and info format. I prefer the info format when browsing and the man page when searching for specific things, but that's a personal preference.

There are also a few on-line resources for screen users. First is Sven Guckes' screen pages at www.math.fu-berlin.de/~guckes/screen. Second is the helpful screen mailing list at groups.yahoo.com/group/gnu-screen. The mailing list is the first place you should go with questions after you have exhausted the available documentation. You must be subscribed to post.

Adam Lazur is a Linux consultant doing things ranging from embedded Linux to Beowulf clusters. In his spare time, Adam likes to write about himself in the third person. Adam welcomes comments about this article at adam@lazur.org.

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Re: Changing escape key sequence for screen.

Anonymous's picture

Far better is to use vi which doesn't require the use of control/meta keys!

Re: Changing escape key sequence for screen.

Anonymous's picture

C-g is also critical for canceling commands...

Re: Changing escape key sequence for screen.

Anonymous's picture

Alternatives include:

escape ^Oo (C-o opens a new line in emacs)
escape ^Pp (C-p moves the cursor to the previous line)

Re: Changing escape key sequence for screen.

Anonymous's picture

Five years ago my screen escape and literal command characters of choice for Emacs noninterference:

escape "^^^^"

Using Ctrl-^ was a bit awkward but I got used to it. If I were using screen as much nowadays I'd probably choose a different character, maybe even a function key.

The first thing I looked for

sqweek's picture

The first thing I looked for when I started using screen was an option to change the escape key - I didn't fancy having to hit C-a a to move to the start of the line.
After thinking about it for a while, I came up with this:
escape `\'
Which I'm a big fan of. For some reason hitting ` ' to get a backquote just feels intuitive (though it might help that I use dvorak so ' is where q is on qwerty).

Sessions for X

Anonymous's picture

I love screen. But what I want is something that can do stateful sessions with X programs when my X server crashes. VNC is to slow, and Xmove I couldn't get to work. Any suggestions?

My address is davidmccabe ta myrealbox tod com

if you'd like to contact me about that.

Thanks!

Re: Sessions for X

Anonymous's picture

have you looked at ratpoison? (http://ratpoison.sourceforge.net)

I thought I remember reading somewhere that you could detach and attach

sessions...but I can't seem to find it documented anywhere now. Anyway,

if you like screen, you might like ratpoison.

Re: Sessions for X

Anonymous's picture

Yes, I use Ratpoison right now, and no, it doesn't do that.

Re: Sessions for X

Anonymous's picture
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