2002 Readers' Choice Awards

The votes are in, and—big surprise—they're not much different from last year.
Favorite Shell

1. bash

2. tcsh

3. zsh

The printout of votes collected in this category is always the shortest, tidiest of the bunch. It's not that people don't vote in the favorite shell category—over 5,000 people did—it's that everybody's so quiet about it. So what can be said about bash? It's dependable, flexible, extendable, hardworking and 83% of voters chose it as their favorite.

Favorite Linux Journal Column

1. Cooking with Linux

2. Kernel Korner

3. Paranoid Penguin

Marcel Gagné will be very happy to learn that he's your favorite for the second year in a row. Maybe poor François can have a glass of wine to celebrate instead of running to the cellar all night. To those of you who wrote in that all the articles are your favorite, thank you; the checks are in the mail.

Favorite Processor Architecture

1. AMD Athlon

2. Intel Pentiums

3. AMD Duron

Athlon and the various Pentiums were the big winners this year. Combined, the two processors received 74% of the total votes, with about two-thirds of that percentage going to Athlon. Not too many write-ins for this category, but Itanium, Power4 and Zilog Z-8000 (!) all made appearances.

Favorite Communications Board

1. Cyclades

2. Digi International

3. Sangoma

Okay, guys, we explained this category last year, but once more: the communications board category includes things like internal WAN router cards that let servers act as WAN routers and multiport serial cards to connect printers, point-of-sale devices and the like. Of the votes collected, Cyclades is the favorite for another year.

Favorite Database

1. MySQL

2. PostgreSQL

3. InterBase

By a two-to-one margin, MySQL is the voters' favorite again this year. MySQL won the LJ Editors' Choice Award this year too. Last year's third-place winner, Oracle, slipped to fourth place this time, replaced by InterBase. The write-in favorite is Firebird, a commercially independent relational database based on InterBase source code. To the voter who asked—no, a “haphazard arrangement of XML files” does not count.

Favorite Backup Utility

1. tar

2. Amanda

3. Arkeia

tar won by a landslide again this year, receiving just under 2,000 more votes than its closest competitor and 90% of the total votes in the category. rsync is the big write-in favorite. Of course, the point is moot because “real men don't need backups”—right? Well, maybe only the guy who followed up that comment with the admission he'd deleted his hard drive twice.

Favorite Programming Beverage

1. Coffee

2. Water

3. Tea

The write-ins for this category are always fun, because we get to catch up on all the new sodas and coffee drinks available, especially those available abroad. Sometimes the emotions run as high here as they do in the favorite distribution category. What we learned: Coca-Cola cannot be lumped in with the more general Soda category; some of you actually like Vanilla Coke; they still make Afri Cola; Hi-C isn't only for kids; and Swedish coffee kicks wussy-American coffee's butt. Between caffeine and sugar, you people are wired to the gills.

Favorite Linux Game

1. Quake 3

2. Tux Racer

3. Freeciv

We collected 3,514 total votes in the favorite game category, and the first-place winner, Quake 3, only received 473 votes. Do you know what that means? It means a lot of games are out there, and each one is somebody's favorite. Among write-ins, Frozen Bubble and Return to Castle Wolfenstein are the most popular.

Favorite Web Browser

1. Mozilla

2. Galeon

3. Konqueror

Last year's winner, Netscape, fell to fourth and fifth place this year (we split it out into Netscape 4.x and Netscape 6.x), as Mozilla overwhelmingly claimed the title of favorite web browser. Galeon, the GNOME browser based on the Mozilla rendering engine, picked up the slack and rushed in to second place. Thankfully, the number of Internet Explorer write-ins dropped significantly.

______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Re: 2002 Readers' Choice Awards

Anonymous's picture

What about a media player section? Mplayer, Xine, and Avifile all have their followers..

Re: 2002 Readers' Choice Awards

Anonymous's picture

Are detailed results available? I would like to know the breakdown in the games category.

Re: 2002 Readers' Choice Awards

Anonymous's picture

Yeah, totally. like, what was next? I want to discover some new games..

Re: 2002 Readers' Choice Awards

Anonymous's picture

frozen bubble aka snoods (dos) and lbreakout2 aka dx-ball2(win) are addictive

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState