Quixote: a Python-Centric Web Application Framework

If you need to create dynamic web sites and don't want to learn the syntax and arbitrary limitations of yet another templating language, you should give Quixote a serious look.
Conclusion

Quixote originally was written because we were dissatisfied with the available options for writing web applications in Python. The only tool that came close to what we wanted was Zope, which turned out to be much bigger and more complex than we needed. Zope has the “web designer” vs. “web developer” distinction built in from the start, and works very hard to make a web site mostly editable through the web itself. This is an interesting idea, but it adds tremendous complexity to Zope. As programmers who are quite happy using text editors and the filesystem, we felt left out in the cold. Thus, in creating Quixote, we shamelessly stole Zope's best idea (mapping URLs to Python objects) and geared the whole thing towards Python programmers. The most obvious example of this is that where Zope maps URLs to arbitrary objects in an object database, Quixote maps them to Python packages, modules and functions—objects that are easily created and manipulated by Python programmers using nothing more than a text editor. The result is a web application framework that makes the creation of dynamic web pages so easy it almost feels like cheating.

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quixote wiki link

charter97's picture

welcome to quixote.ca