Welcome to the 100th Issue of Linux Journal

While I'm sure that this is only the first hundred-mark of many, you might want to keep this issue in good shape for putting in your children's time capsule.

I still tend to think of myself as a newcomer to the magazine, having been on the masthead for only one-fifth of the now 100 issues. But those 20 issues have been an enriching experience. Each issue has presented its own challenges and dilemmas.

Some issues even hosted their own minor polemics. Nothing sparks comment like nudity, and our staff had a lot of fun reading and choosing which of the letters regarding the nude cover of the Python supplement to print. Then there was the “American” debate, begun in the November 2000 issue, which also spanned more than a couple of issues. Who could forget the QSOL advertisement, also from the November 2000 issue? The “improper” implication spawned some memorable press, but I'm sure it would never have happened if we hadn't made the first step and put the naked man on the cover, obviously giving QSOL the impression that we were “that kind of magazine”. QSOL's following ad was as frightening as the previous ad was suggestive, perhaps in a effort to take revenge on on those not yet prepared for their style of advertising.

These events made the letters section perhaps the most-read part of the magazine, but the most fun part of working for Linux Journal has been the interaction with both the Linux community and the rest of the hardworking Linux Journal staff.

As our magazine is one that relies on community-submitted content, I've been fortunate to be able to get to know many very talented hackers. And I'm not just talking about the famous members of the Linux community. Just as some of the best actors in the world are only seen on community stages, some of the smartest coders are garage hobbyists or work for small companies. The general high level of goodwill that emits from our authors, regular contributing editors and is evident throughout the community, consistently impresses me and makes my job a much happier one. Our reliance on you—our readers and contributors—makes this 100th issue celebration as much yours as it is ours. Sincere thanks for all of your help and support.

Richard Vernon is editor in chief of Linux Journal.

Wish you were here.

______________________

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Re: Welcome to the 100th Issue of Linux Journal

Anonymous's picture

i have yet to receive my copy :(

impatient... impatient :)

well, Germany is a little far from US i think... sigh

regards,

SIanLUn, slau@wahlau.org

Germany.

Indeed, the right one on target

Emin's picture

Just received the 100th issue and excited to read thru the article "Linux Timeline" (pg 72). Thanks for 'ringing those bells'

I soon want to share the article titled "The Linux Router" with my IS dept manager and see if they can at least come with its equivalent. And, then demo my little LAN router (P120,48mb,4gb between two subnets) at home. Hope this would convince them that 'shipping crate' doesn't mean anything.

P.S: Wish I received the Tux calendar to display it in my office (and make 'them' envious)

Re: Welcome to the 100th Issue of Linux Journal

Anonymous's picture

Just received the 100th issue along with a great surpsire -- the 2002-2003 Tux calendar. Thanks, LJ, for the calendar, the 32 extra pages in the 100th issue, and the great 99 past issues.

Keep up the good work!

Re: Welcome to the 100th Issue of Linux Journal

Anonymous's picture

Congratulations to Linux Journal and its staff.

This is a great publication. I have been a subscriber since 1998.

One suggestion...could you publish 2 issues per month?

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