New Number One Linux Vendor to Port Reuters Financial App

HP, Red Hat, Intel to help port Reuters Market Data Systems software to Linux.

Hewlett-Packard, which having completed its merger with Compaq now claims the title of largest Linux services company in the world, announced Thursday that it has landed a joint project with Red Hat and Intel to port the Reuters Market Data Systems software to Linux. An HP spokesperson estimated that the deal "could exceed $200 million."

The Reuters software is designed to integrate market data and news for thousands of users within a financial institution. Financial institutions are demanding that more and more software run on Linux. Tom McDonald, executive director at Morgan Stanley, said "Support for this platform from Reuters is important to our efforts and is strategic to Morgan Stanley."

Peter Blackmore, Executive Vice President of HP's Enterprise Systems Group, said at a press conference that HP now has "twice the market share of any of our competitors" in Linux services. The financial industry is a key area for HP, he added, with "a huge pent up demand" for financial applications on Linux. "We have a completely dedicated vertical line of business to this market," he added.

Michael Tiemann, CTO of Red Hat, said that Linux is a faster, not just a cheaper, alternative to proprietary UNIX. For exaple, he said, Credit Suisse First Boston moved its trading software from UNIX on proprietary hardware to Linux on Intel with a 20X performance gain. "Linux is becoming the dominant platfrom in the financial services market," Tiemann said, "We are breaking UNIX bottlenecks on Wall Street." Another Red Hat customer on Wall Street is reporting a 3X throughput improvement for an in-house Java application, he said.

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Re: New Number One Linux Vendor to Port Reuters Financial App

Anonymous's picture

One word: Scalability

From embedded systems to super computers.

Unbelievable scalability. IMHO.

No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs??

Romulus007's picture

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Folks! I just don't get it!! I am a big fan of Linux (Suse & Mandrake) and the BSDs (Net, Open and Free), but I can't understand for the sake of sanity why the BSDs do not also share the spotlight with Linux with regards to big vendors like HP, IBM, Compaq, et al. Can someone explain? The BSDs have been around since the 70s and is battle-tested everyday on Yahoo, WalnutCreek, HotMail (some parts) and its architectual design is very clean (note how easy it is to port NetBSD to any platform).

So, am I missing out on something or what? You have legends like Bill Joy (Cal-Berkely days), Jordan Hubbard, Theo de Radt, and the other extremely talented "core group" members whom are "as good as it gets", but all the MONEY, somehow, seems to flow towards Linux. Why is that?

Everyone agrees that FreeBSD 5.0 is, arguably, the fastest O/S out there for servers or desktops. And we all know of OpenBSD's legendary security audits. So...how did Linux garner all of this mindshare? Mind you, I have no qualms with Linux, but it is buggier than the BSDs because the distros and their coders seem to want to rush thing out the door in such a hurry in contrast to the BSD philosophy. This is something everyone can vouch for.

Oh well!! I just wished both camps could mold together because one side (Linux) seems to have the latest drivers and software for almost everything while the other side (the BSDs) seems to have a great code base, impeccible design, and exceptionally talented core groups that can hold their own against organization (public or private). I've heard on numerous occasions how the Linux code base is very messy and unorganized whereas NetBSD's code is a joy to read.

Again, what gives?

Re: No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs??

Anonymous's picture

Linux is more flexible. It evolves faster. In my opinion this is because of two things:

- A mindset inherited from GNU (more inviting to new contributors).

- The leardership style pioneered by Linus and then imitated by others.

I think that the Linux advantage is largely cultural, but that's very important.

Linux has a less rigid social structure. New users are accepted easily. The GPL provides a confort that many developers appreciate. Linus then contributed a leadership model which focuses on releasing often and enlisting the help of users and anyone who would submit a patch or bug report.

The end result is that Linux has legions of developers quickly improving the code. Thus, Linux has a larger following and it grows and adapts more quickly than the BSDs while avoiding the splitting of code.

Re: No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs?? Easy becau

Anonymous's picture

LInux has more pluses overall than the BSDs thats it.Period. Its better overall. Let us count the ways:

1. The GPL. The big computer companies don't want to go into the software business, they want to sell services and equipment. GPLed Linux is a good base to standardize the software part on, hold it constant for everybody and then compete on the services and equipment. These guys have been there done that with UNIX fragmentation, it has not worked. Why adopt systems where the license allows competitors to take the codebase proprietary then have to explain to customers all over again why this is different from the old IRIX, HPUX,Solaris etc game?

2. Linux has a larger developer community, thats active and commited. Larger means larger than the BSDs, so why not go with them? at least that fact alone gives it momentum. Chalk that one up to Linus.

3. The above means more apps period.
4. Linux runs on more stuff. Why go with a platform that does not run on everything you've got in your product line. At any rate it creates the potential for a single software base for all your equipment. Its not just about the desktop
5. Linux is fast, it scales better (relative to BSDs at least). May BSDs may be a bit faster but marginally so and not for all applications, so why give up the other pluses Linux offers for just a bit more speed. May be BSDs codebase is neater but more people are working on Linux, that messy codebase is not inhibiting rapid development of linux
6. Linux has a great cohort of developers
7. Linus!. Hey, leadership counts for a lot.

Re: No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs??

Anonymous's picture

One word: GNU.

Also, worse is better.

How do you feel about the Debian GNU/NetBSD project?

Oooops!!

Romulus007's picture

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Are we talking philosophy here?

>

Yes, Windoze is worse and has the bigger market share! :-)

But I also feel that Linux/BSD/Unix/etc users are more tech savvy and somehow are clueless at how to make things "user-friendly." Fortunately KDE and GNOME have realized this and it appears that creating apps are getting easier now that Netbeans, Eclispe, Delphi-Kylix, KDeveloper and other IDEs have arrived. My question is this: "What took you guys so long?" Thankfully, Apple has combined the best of both worlds (unix and a nice GUI) so that "you can have it your way." The problem is that I'd like to build my own best-of-breed parts X-86 box instead of buying a cotton'pikin Mac.

>

I'm still not sure what to make of it yet! You would think that the Open Source community would decide on a standardized way of installing or updating apps and/or OS-specific stuff so that Yast/RPM/Ports/etc would be un-necessary. This alone would have a huge impact in this realm. Also, you have KOffice, StarOffice (OpenOffice), and other productivity tools...but why not put an emphasis in doing "one" product using all of these talented developers? Then, when that one product is up to par with MS-Office, by all means go your separate way and do whatever. That's all.

Re: No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs??

Romulus007's picture

>

Are we talking philosophy here?

>

Yes, Windoze is worse and has the bigger market share! :-)

>

I'm still not sure what to make of it yet.

Re: No disrespect to Linux, but what about the BSDs??

Anonymous's picture

Hey, Have you noticed Apple is using FreeBSD in OS X, their new OS??

Yes, I forgot to mention that!

Romulus007's picture

I completely fogot to mention OS X. Yes, here's more proof that the BSDs should be getting more support.