BRU-Pro 2.0: A Product Review

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An easy and fast installation, streamlined admin tools and meticulous data accountability—this is backup software?
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Ooops... just realized I

Daniel (whose name apparently belongs to a registered user)'s picture

Ooops... just realized I commented on a review of MUCH OLDER version of BRU. It seems that the product has been rebranded as BRU Server, which reached version 2.0 only 7 years after BRU-Pro 2.0 was released!

I hope someone got a laugh out of this... unfortunately it seems like Tolis Group is still struggling with quality problems.

This review is superficial

Daniel (whose name apparently belongs to a registered user)'s picture

This review is superficial and misleading. I agree with the commenter from UC Berkeley above. It seems that Cosimo did not really use the software in a production environment, but rather just fired it up quickly for the purpose of the review.

I find it particularly interesting that he lightly brushes off "Windows 2000 and XP clients somewhat unstable or unpredictable". As if that is not a major problem with a backup system. Oh, maybe you don't care about your Windows systems at Linux Journal, since they're probably just for testing and ridicule purposes anyway?

For the record, just go ahead and add the GUI configuration tool to that list of "The Bad". There are bugs present in the GUI admin tool that were present in the old version 1.2.0. Example: the GUI does not reliably show which files are selected to be backed up. I reported this bug over a year ago and the tech said something about the new version having a totally rewritten GUI interface that will fix all these issues...yeah, nice way to get me off the phone.

My other complaint is that BRU is totally and irrevocably geared toward tape backups. You would think that a newly redesigned backup tool would at least begin to integrate modern features. Lets face it, tape backup is dying, and disk and over-the-wire backups are becoming more and more common as the cost of storage plummets. I know, I know, tape is the only reliable medium for long-term storage, but disk backups must be made easier since short-to-medium term backups are much easier to manage on disk (restoring from tape is finicky and should never be necessary unless you really need that file that was deleted 10 years ago). BRU's disk stage backup system is an inflexible afterthought, making it fairly difficult to implement a rhobust disk oriented backup system.

So far I am not impressed with BRU 2.0

Re: BRU-Pro 2.0: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

It's not clear from the above review whether the Cosimo tried to actually use BRU-Pro to back up real data, or whether he stopped after reading the manual, installing the software, and playing with it a little. In any event, I found this review to be far more positive than our actual experience!

Based partly on this review, our laboratory, a computational genomics research group at UC Berkeley, demoed and then purchased the product. However, we ran into all kinds of trouble which would not be obvious unless one actually used the product. A summary of our (overwhelmingly negative) experience is here.

Re: BRU-Pro 2.0: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

While I agree that BRU-PRO has many positive features, the biggest drawback is the lack of tape management. Once you build up a number of tapes, it is hard to determine what data is on which tape apart from keeping a manual record. This can make it difficult to determine whether you wish to overwrite a particular tape.

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