Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Setting up an SMTP mail server for multiple domains on a single machine with remote access via IMAP.
Administration

Most of the administration tasks, such as adding, modifying and deleting accounts and aliases, require modifying the LDAP directory. You can do this with the OpenLDAP command-line tools or a generic LDAP browser like gq. These methods are cumbersome, however, because they are generic tools and are not tailored to the task of administering e-mail accounts. We've been working on a web administration application called Jamm that is essentially an application-specific LDAP browser written in Java and JSP. It also has its own LDAP schema that is a slightly modified Courier schema. Jamm is currently usable and is constantly evolving. Visit the Jamm web page on SourceForge for the latest Jamm information.

Account Creation Notes

When you create an account or an alias inside the LDAP database it will instantly become active as far as the mail system is concerned. For virtual accounts, note that the UNIX directory in ~vmail is not created at this time. However, we can work around this because Postfix's virtual delivery agent will create the necessary directories the first time it has to deliver mail. Due to this fact, we recommend sending a welcome e-mail as soon as you create the account.

Account Deletion Notes

When you delete an account or an alias in the LDAP database, it will instantly become inactive. For virtual accounts, note that the UNIX filesystem isn't cleaned up. In other words, the data remains on disk until a system administrator can remove it. This allows you to keep the data from dead accounts for a grace period in case the account was deleted in error. However, if another account is created with the same name and the same mail path, the data will be available to the new account. This could be considered a privacy violation for the previous user.

Resources

Dave Dribin (dave@dribin.org) has been using UNIX since 1991 and Linux since 1993. He has been professionally developing software for or on UNIX since 1995. Dave is currently working as an independant consultant at the National Association of Realtors.

Keith Garner has been using Linux since January 1994. He has been professionally administrating and developing software for UNIX since 1997. Keith is currently employed by the National Association of Realtors.

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What about procmail??

Atrillanes's picture

Have I missed something in your article? Or you have just omitted the part where procmail gets into the picture?

dn of the user objects

Ahmed El Zein's picture

Hi,
Why is the dn of the users mail=user@domain,o=domain,etc? would it not make more sense to have a dn of cn=user,o=domain,etc (like you did for the postmaster)?

The only reason I can think of if to be able to search through the whole tree by email address. wouldn't it be faster to separate user and domain and just search under the o=domain? especially if you have a huge amount of users for each domain?

Re: Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Anonymous's picture

I don't see a reply to the previous comment. I'm having a similar problem.

Given the format of the cn=postmaster,o=domain1.example..., I suspect that objectClass: organizationalRole needs to be present.

Another question, however, is why are the "mail:" attributes empty? They are required fields and the LDAP server balks at there being no entry there.

Re: Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Anonymous's picture

Since OpenLDAP 2.2 (I don't know if earlier too) LDAP entities must have "structural" object class. Classes top, CourierMailAccount, CourierMailAlias are "auxiliary" clasess. You should add to each entity "structural" class: domain, organization, organizationalPerson, etc.
So eg.

dn: dc=myhosting, dc=example
objectClass: top

should be

dn: dc=myhosting, dc=example
objectClass: domain
dc: myhosting

You can also change those objectClasses to STRUCTURAL

Darian's picture

...by modifying authldap.schema and replacing "AUXILIARY" with "STRUCTURAL" on the CourierMailAccount, CourierMailAlias, and CourierDomainAlias.

Keep in mind, however, that you can only have one structural objectClass, just in case you plan on hanging e-mail information off of an inetOrgPerson or somesuch.

Re: Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Anonymous's picture

Hi, I'm trying to follow your example, but I'm having a couple of problems here...

in the first ldif (base.ldif), I had to take out all the first spaces in the lines, and when I try to make an ldapadd I'm getting:

dapadd: update failed: dc=myhosting, dc=example
ldap_add: Object class violation (65)
additional info: no structural object class provided

any suggestions?

Re: Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Anonymous's picture

This article looks abandoned ... but .. I am having the same problem and really don't know what to do here.

Re: Large-Scale Mail with Postfix, OpenLDAP and Courier

Anonymous's picture

Dear friend

Hi and thanks for the solution provided by you
but do you have any solution for multiple servers running under one domain. with the helpof ldap server database replication.

regds
amit jain
amitldap@hotmail.com

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