Linux Terminal Server Project

Reduce costs and improve productivity with easy-to-install diskless workstations.
Conclusion

Some important features elevate the stature of this open-source project: its up-to-date documentation, which guides the user through the entire installation; configuration and troubleshooting process; the project's contributions area where people have added their own enhancements to the software, including support for things such as LDAP and dynamic DNS; and its very active mailing list, where most of the questions are swiftly answered by the developers themselves.

The LTSP is now part of SourceForge—good news for users and developers alike. Many new contributions and enhancements to the software are sure to come in the near future, making LTSP the tool of choice for many diskless workstation networks in Latin America and the rest of the world. The recent appearance of a Red Hat-based distribution by the K12 Project (www.riverdale.k12.or.us/linux/k12ltsp.html) includes software from the LTSP. That the K12 Project is aimed mainly at schools and children is proof of the great advancement and significance of the LTSP.

The project's documentation has been translated into Spanish but not yet to other languages. We hope that the LTSP's affiliation with SourceForge means many eager translators from different countries will soon start contributing their work.

Since my first experience with the LTSP, I have had the chance to implement its diskless workstations solution in several environments, including public schools, internet cafés and small companies. To our satisfaction, all of those networks are working smoothly today and most of the users have benefited from the new technology. Maybe this is what the Open Source movement is all about: helping people help themselves.

I'd like to thank Jim McQuillan (jam@McQuil.com) and his friends for their outstanding contribution to the Open Source movement, the development and maintenance of the Linux Terminal Server Project.

Jorge Eduardo Nieto Lema is a 32-year-old Colombian who works as an independent Linux consultant. He is currently working on a port of the LTSP's software to his favorite Linux distribution: the great Slackware. He can be reached at jnieto@yupimail.com.

______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

an inspriring article

vinod kumar's picture

An excellent article which has helped to set a similar environment , making use of redundant machines, to help a small school.
cheers

Re: Linux Terminal Server Project

Anonymous's picture

The last day Jorge told me about your article...
I read the article and thinks is excellent.
Congratulation!!

Re: Linux Terminal Server Project

Anonymous's picture

I've started to investigate the LTSP, and I'm very impressed with it.

I work in corporate IT, but do volunteer work setting up IT infrastructure for community organisations. I often have access to older PC's - now I've got a(nother) use for them - setting up diskless workstations for these community organisations.

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix