Linux and the New Internet Computer

The New Internet Computer Company may become known for producing and selling the lowest-cost Internet and network capable computer on the market today—the NIC, or New Internet Computer.
______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

need some help

Anonymous's picture

i am not able to use net from my service provider.i tried to run commads but it didnt helped me.can anyone put light on how to use net using my oun isp instead of net zero i am not very experienced in linux.

My Take On The NIC

sulement's picture

I have recently had the pleasure of playing with the NIC. Using the original disc shows too many limitations. The dead links, the aged and crashy Netscape 4.76 browser lead you to believe it's only current purpose is to provide you with a good working laptop CD ROM drive.

BUT, add a Puppy Linux Barebones or a Damn Small Linux hacked especially for the NIC, (a better choice, by the way), and something magic happens.

The NIC I used was given a memory upgrade from 32MB to 64MB. Good as long as you use a low-profile RAM stick. (It has to be low-profile to keep the CD ROM from tilting too far forward to allow its door to open).

I'm told the NIC can take up to 256MB of RAM. I wasn't able to try it.

The Puppy Linux is a great light-overhead version of Linux and the Dillo browser is pretty darned nice. But if you're going to make it
an ultimately user-friendly box, I recommend the Damn Small Linux.

Automatic video settings, automatic network card discovery and Firefox as the browser of choice give the old NIC a flair that makes it a kick to use.

With no hard drive, you are surfing on a virus-free, spyware-free
compact machine. If websurfing is your largest goal, this little box is the most fun you can have on a low-priced little computer.

Of course Puppy and Damn Small come with some great programs, as does
the original NIC CD. And the NIC is a pretty tweakable little box.

I have one that we pushed to run with an AMD K6-2 at about 457Mhz. thanks to the adjustable voltage and multiplier settings in the BIOS.

All-in-all, the NIC is a cool and still very useable computer. If you
are lucky enough to get your hands on one, have fun with it. It's bound to put a smile on your face.

Linux Damn Small hackeado for nic

Anonymous's picture

pleace link web for download Linux Damn Small for nic thank :)

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState