Linux System Calls

How to use the mechanism provided by the IA32 architecture for handling system calls.
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system call

Anonymous's picture

Hi,

Just wanted to know if I want to printk the parameters used in a systemcall how do I go about it? To do so I am trying to access the %eax, %ebx and the other registers used to store the parameters and printk the parameters but not sure how to go about it. I am writing a loadable kernel module to do so. Any idea how to do it?

Thanks in Advance

fork() implementation

Anonymous's picture

can anyone tell me where assembly routines implementing sysytem call can be found.

Very good article overall.

Anonymous's picture

Very good article overall. But I don't know what software exceptions have to do with interruptions and hardware exceptions; I am pretty sure they are totally unrelated. I think it would be better to focus in hardware exceptions, like arithmetic ones, whose handlers are placed in the vector table.

Much of the content in this a

Anonymous's picture

Much of the content in this article was taken directly from "How System Calls Work on Linux/i86" by Michael K. Johnson and Stanley Scalsky which is located at this URL:

http://www.tldp.org/LDP/khg/HyperNews/get/syscall/syscall86.html

Copyright (C) 1993, 1996 Michael K. Johnson, johnsonm@redhat.com.
Copyright (C) 1993 Stanley Scalsky

No mention of credit was given by Moshe Bar to the original authors. At the very least this is plagiarism and a blatant copyright violation.

You must not have read the original article, or did you?

Carsten's picture

The two articles are not in the least identical and the article you refer to is not in the least as exhaustive as this article. I would say that Moshe did a good job here at both taking available information by the kernel hackers and, second, providing even more indepth information on how it is actually done.

who cares....

Anonymous's picture

who cares....

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