Mark's Mega Multi-Boot Computer

Mark talks about his crazy multi-boot computer, which does have some practical value.
Conclusion

There are different ways to set up a multi-boot system using Linux and other operating systems. If you do it right, you can use one kernel for all the Linux distributions. In the method shown, the swap partition is shared by all Linux distributions.

If I had started from scratch, I would have used one 20GB IDE hard drive. As a suggestion, if you have to duplicate the configuration above, I would install Windows 98 first, then Windows NT, then FreeBSD, then the Linux distributions.

Personally, I think it is very cool and exciting how there are so many options associated with LILO. In my opinion, both LILO and the kernel are very well-designed. LILO makes it easy to do the weird stuff like I did above. Thanks to all the guys who developed LILO and the Linux kernel, and to Paul Hostetler and Phil Hunter for their help.

Resources

Mark Nielsen works at The Computer Underground, Inc., http://www.tcu-inc.com/, as a Linux geek and enjoys doing silly things and making up silly projects, because hey, computers are supposed to be fun. Mark also works at http://www.800linux.com/ as a professional consultant. During his spare time, he writes in Perl (mostly SQL and object-oriented), HTML, JavaScript, SQL for PostgreSQL and UNIX shell scripting. His long-term desires are to conquer the Ramsey numbers and help spread information about Linux software and Linux-compatible hardware to the galaxy in the best and coolest ways.

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