The Proper Image for Linux

Dr. Bentson did a survey of Linux kernel developers to find out about their backgrounds. Here are the results.
Postscript

I just received a note from the person who sparked the original survey. He reports:

I took my “hand-me-down” Linux box, an unimpressive 75MHz Pentium with 64MB RAM and a tiny 600MB HD to work. My boss was amazed that office applications such as StarOffice were available and was quite impressed when I read a Word document with StarOffice and then converted it to HTML. Samba was another revelation. Overall performance impressed him. In a few crude tests, it outperformed a “commercial” system running with 128MB RAM, dual 200MHz processors and all ultra-fast/ultra-wide SCSI drives.

After a couple of callers indicated an interest in UNIX versions, we checked the price of current systems. My boss decided Linux was indeed priced right, and asked me to start on a port.

It looks like we've won one more away from the dark side.

Randolph Bentson 's first UNIX experience was booting a BSD VAX system on July 3, 1981—the whole town had a celebration the next day. Dr. Bentson started contributing to the Linux kernel in May 1994, and his book Inside Linux: A Look at Operating System Development describes how many modern operating system features have evolved and become essential parts of Linux. He can be reached at bentson@grieg.seaslug.org.

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