The Proper Image for Linux

Dr. Bentson did a survey of Linux kernel developers to find out about their backgrounds. Here are the results.
Postscript

I just received a note from the person who sparked the original survey. He reports:

I took my “hand-me-down” Linux box, an unimpressive 75MHz Pentium with 64MB RAM and a tiny 600MB HD to work. My boss was amazed that office applications such as StarOffice were available and was quite impressed when I read a Word document with StarOffice and then converted it to HTML. Samba was another revelation. Overall performance impressed him. In a few crude tests, it outperformed a “commercial” system running with 128MB RAM, dual 200MHz processors and all ultra-fast/ultra-wide SCSI drives.

After a couple of callers indicated an interest in UNIX versions, we checked the price of current systems. My boss decided Linux was indeed priced right, and asked me to start on a port.

It looks like we've won one more away from the dark side.

Randolph Bentson 's first UNIX experience was booting a BSD VAX system on July 3, 1981—the whole town had a celebration the next day. Dr. Bentson started contributing to the Linux kernel in May 1994, and his book Inside Linux: A Look at Operating System Development describes how many modern operating system features have evolved and become essential parts of Linux. He can be reached at bentson@grieg.seaslug.org.

______________________

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix