Linux Network Programming, Part 2

In part 2 of our series we learn how to design and code network daemons to serve our clients well.
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Thanks!!

Rajeev's picture

Thanks a lot for this wonderful information. I needed to create a daemon and i think i have hit the correct page to begin with. Adding one example code would definitely help. Thanks once again.

Thank you!!

Chris Rhode's picture

This is a very well written primer for writing daemons. I am in the process of writing one now and was looking for a concise summary as to what is needed. Needless to say I have found what I am looking for!

Thank you very much Ivan for a superb write up!

Re: Linux Network Programming, Part 2

Anonymous's picture

thx...thx...thx :)

Re: Linux Network Programming, Part 2

Anonymous's picture

i have a windows service that i went to work on linux.

i change the code so it's run on linux,

but i went it to work like windows service, so it's conitnue to work after

i logout the system, and log it's activety to known place.

is this Daemon Processes (and syslog) are sutiable for me needs.

Re: Linux Network Programming, Part 2

Anonymous's picture

yes. daemons do not receive terminal signals so they do not die when you log out.

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