Visual SlickEdit: A Commercial Editor for Programmers

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This editor is cross-platform, with versions available for all three Windows variants, OS/2 and a variety of Unix platforms.
Performance

I found SlickEdit to be a very responsive editor on my Pentium 120 machine with 32MB of memory. Its memory footprint and loading time are comparable to those of GNU Emacs, and about half of what XEmacs requires. Search and replace operations are quick, and file operations (loading, switching from one buffer to another, etc.) seem to be as fast as can be expected.

Availability and Support

MicroEdge maintains a web site for SlickEdit users and prospective customers at http://www.slickedit.com/. Patches for registered users are available there, as well as macros and tips from other users and the MicroEdge developers.

At around $200 US for the Linux version, the price will probably be too steep for many Linux users, especially with so many high-quality free editors available. The program is intended for professional developers, in particular those working in a cross-platform shop. A programmer routinely collaborating on large projects with colleagues using Windows, OS/2 or another Unix variant would find this editor very useful, as project files and macros are compatible across platforms.

Larry Ayers lives on a small farm in northern Missouri, where he raises sheep, shiitake and shell-scripts. His e-mail address is layers@marktwain.net.

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Slickedit has some valuable

Anonymous's picture

Slickedit has some valuable functions, along with some odd behavior.
1. usually too many bug, and slow/hang for large project
2. even you type a simple label, it may freeze a few seconds try to get function prototype to display
3. print function under linux is odd and much worse then gedit
4. looking for reference is stupid, may pop up a large list

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