Network Buffers and Memory Management

Writing a network device driver for Linux is fundamentally simple—most of the complexity (other than talking to the hardware) involves managing network packets in memory.
Ethernet Support Routines

Ethernet is probably the most common physical interface type that can be handled. The kernel provides a set of general purpose Ethernet support routines that such drivers can use.

eth_header() is the standard Ethernet handler for the dev-hard_header routine, and can be used in any Ethernet driver. Combined with eth_rebuild_header() for the rebuild routine it provides all the ARP lookup required to put Ethernet headers on IP packets.

The eth_type_trans() routine expects to be fed a raw Ethernet packet. It analyses the headers and sets skb->pkt_type and skb->mac itself as well as returning the suggested value for skb->protocol. This routine is normally called from the Ethernet driver receive interrupt handler to classify packets.

eth_copy_and_sum(), the final Ethernet support routine is internally quite complex, but offers significant performance improvements for memory mapped cards. It provides the support to copy and checksum data from the card into a sk_buff in a single pass. This single pass through memory almost eliminates the cost of checksum computation when used and improves IP throughput.

Alan Cox has been working on Linux since version 0.95, when he installed it in order to do further work on the AberMUD game. He now manages the Linux Networking, SMP, and Linux/8086 projects and hasn't done any work on AberMUD since November 1993.

______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

What about rmem_max / rmem_default ?

Anonymous's picture

An admirable in-depth article. Just a stupid question (I'm so slow-witted) : I still don't catch the link between the rmem_default/rmem_max sysctl parameters (socket receive buffer default/max length) and the buffer allocated by dev_alloc_skb(). Socket receive buffer vs buffer of skb : are we talking about he same memory area, or are they different things (involving necessarily a copy from the one to the other, sooner or later) ?

Thanks for anyone who would make it clear to me,
Telenn

Missing pictures

Ovy's picture

The links to figures do not work (File not found error). I guess time does matter (1996 article!). To anyone reading this article, please provide us some links for the pictures (or link to some other up to date articles).

Thank you,
Ovy

Fixed

Mitch Frazier's picture

Should be working now.

Mitch Frazier is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal.

thnx

Ravikumar's picture

thanx for the great article..

at each layer the data and tail pointers change right??

so if i need to acces the L7 data,consider UDP can i take the from pre routing hook can i take data+udphdr->length..??

Help Required....

Ram's picture

Hi Alan Cox,
Thanx for the article.
Iam Ram.Iam new to device driver development.
some how i manged to write a network driver.
still i need some help.But I want to access the driver functions directly from user program written in c.

i.e. I want to access the open,close,hard_start_xmit(),ioctl functions directly without using the socket api(socket,bind,connect etc). I want my own function api.
is it possible to do it.

Thanx in adavance,

good article

Ajay Thakur's picture

thanks for this article. It explains most of the things. But still I feel that some more thing related to Bottom Half/Top half processing should be added. and also things are not clear about the logic of freeing/owning skbuffers.

Ajay

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix