Tech Tips

 in

—Kristofer Occhipinti

Three Steps to Find Your Total Download Bandwidth Usage

I have been working on bandwidth-monitoring of late, and I find the following three steps handy to find my download byte count. These steps use iptables, which is available with almost all distributions. It most likely already will be installed on your system (it is the basic firewall in Linux).

Steps one and two set up the monitoring, and step three allows you to view your download byte count. The first two steps need to be done only once (at boot time, if you want this available all the time). You need to run all the steps as root.

Step 1: create a chain:

$ iptables -N input_accounting

This creates an iptables chain named input_accounting.

Step 2: add a rule:

$ iptables -I INPUT -j input_accounting

This causes all incoming packets to “pass through” your newly created chain.

Step 3: start checking your bandwidth:

$ iptables -L -v | \
		grep input_accounting | \
		grep anywhere | \
       	awk '{ printf("%s\n", $2) }'

This should output your download byte count—for example, “500K”.

—Tanmay Mande

______________________

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix