Building Custom Firmware with OpenWrt

 in
Using an inexpensive wireless router, you can build a file server, a print server and even a media server. Plus, you can put all of those together and build the network device that does what you want.
Conclusion

This article demonstrates a technique for providing Kerberos, LDAP, network filesystem, print and media services using a Linksys WRT160NL wireless router. The result is a low-cost network server for the home or small office. OpenWrt has a wide range of packages available, so there is potential for many other solutions to be developed around this capable platform. For example, Samba could allow tight integration with Windows clients. Another option is Netatalk, which provides native Mac OS X file sharing, including integration with Apple's Time Machine backup software. Linux, open-source applications and popular network hardware like the Linksys WRT160NL provide a solid basis for developing innovative devices.

Mike Petullo serves in the US Army and enjoys solving problems with innovative open-source software. He has been working with Linux since 1997 and welcomes your comments at mike@flyn.org.

______________________

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState